In Brief: Drinking water fund tops $9 billion

May 18, 2006

More than $9 billion has been invested in U.S. drinking water improvements on nearly 4,400 projects over the past decade, a report said Thursday.

In its 2005 annual report, the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund said investments had come from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, all 50 states and Puerto Rico with loans largely going to systems serving fewer than 10,000 people.

Projects range from treatment and transmission to finding new water sources.

Congress established the program in 1996 to help finance infrastructure improvements.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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