In Brief: Archaeologists find Augustan head in Italy

May 09, 2006

A marble, bas-relief, head of the Emperor Augustus has been found at a large and well-appointed Roman villa site near Rome.

The head, showing the emperor in profile in his middle years, is to be displayed at the Roman Antiquities Museum at Palazzo Massimo, the Italian news agency ANSA reported Tuesday.

Archaeologists found the head at the bottom of a well at the villa that was constructed between the second century B.C. and the first century A.D.

Augustus, the adopted son of Julius Caesar, was Rome's first emperor.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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