Scholarly journal bill draws criticism

May 08, 2006

A bill introduced in the U.S. Senate as a means to make scientific information more available is being criticized as opening data to misinterpretation.

The Federal Research Public Access Act of 2006 was introduced in the Senate last week by Sens. Joseph Lieberman, D-Conn., and John Coryn, R-Texas. They say it would require 11 government agencies to publish, online, any articles involving research funded by federal dollars, The New York Times reported Monday. The bill would require the articles be made accessible within six months of their print publication.

"Not everybody has a library next door. I don't mean to be flippant about it, but this gives access to anybody," Donald Stewart, a spokesman for Cornyn, told the Times.

But some publishing industry officials criticize the proposal. Howard Garrison, director of public affairs for the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, told the Times the bill, if enacted, would weaken the connection between the journals and their readers and, in addition, journals could lose subscribers and ad revenue if articles were available online.

Other critics say the move could result in scientific data being misinterpreted.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Bribery 'hits 1.6 billion people a year'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Korean tech start-ups offer life beyond Samsung

1 hour ago

As an engineering major at Seoul's Yonsei University, Yoon Ja-Young was perfectly poised to follow the secure, lucrative and socially prized career path long-favoured by South Korea's elite graduates.

Fresh nuclear leak detected at Fukushima plant

13 hours ago

Sensors at the Fukushima nuclear plant have detected a fresh leak of highly radioactive water to the sea, the plant's operator announced Sunday, highlighting difficulties in decommissioning the crippled plant.

Spacewalking astronauts route cable in 1st of 3 jobs

13 hours ago

(AP)—Spacewalking astronauts routed more than 300 feet (90 meters) of cable outside the International Space Station on Saturday, tricky and tiring advance work for the arrival of new American-made crew ...

Recommended for you

Bribery 'hits 1.6 billion people a year'

Feb 27, 2015

A total of 1.6 billion people worldwide – nearly a quarter of the global population – are forced to pay bribes to gain access to everyday public services, according to a new book by academics at the Universities of Birmingham ...

How music listening programmes can be easily fooled

Feb 26, 2015

For well over two decades, researchers have sought to build music listening software that can address the deluge of music growing faster than our Spotify-spoilt appetites. From software that can tell you ...

Nature journal to begin offering double-blind peer review

Feb 23, 2015

Well known and respected journal, Nature, will begin next month offering researchers who submit their work for peer review, the option of having it done via the double-blind method—whereby both submitters and re ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.