Briefs: MySpace removes 200,000 profiles

Mar 31, 2006

MySpace.com removed 200,000 "objectionable" profiles from its network to address fears of Internet security, the Financial Times reported.

The site removed profiles containing either hate speech or risqué content.

The announcement was made by Ross Levinsohn, president of News Corp's Internet division at the Bank of America Media, Telecommunications and Entertainment Conference in New York.

Acquired by Rupert Murdoch's News Corps last year, the site boasting some 65 million users and 250,000 news users each day, is hoping that this is one of many strategic steps in becoming more profitable to advertisers.

According to the FT, News Corp's strategy to attract more advertisers faces two challenges, keeping young users from switching to a new site and keeping advertisers confident that their reputations won't be tainted by "inappropriate content."

In the mean time, the site has continued to add new features including video and a possible ad-search deal could be made in the next week, Levinsohn said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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