Tree-killing beetle found in California

Jul 15, 2005

The Asian Longhorned Beetle, an imported pest that has devoured trees in the New York area, recently turned up at a Sacramento warehouse.

The beetles apparently traveled from China in packing crates used for a shipment of decorative building stone, the Sacramento Bee reported.

Pat Minyard of the California Department of Food and Agriculture said that a squad of smoke jumpers has been brought in to go tree to tree around the warehouse to check for the beetles. Making sure no beetles have gotten loose is expected to take at least a year and cost $800,000, he said.

"One of the things I find frightening about this pest is the eradication method, chopping down trees and chipping them," Minyard said.

The beetles' larvae burrow into trees and eventually destroy the cambium, the layer that carries food and water from roots to leaves. While they prefer maples and elms, the beetles can use any kind of hardwood and could cause havoc if loose in California's fruit groves.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Couples need just one conversation to decide not to have children

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Getting a whiff of climate change

Apr 10, 2014

Monday was the day when millions of people in New York and New Jersey learned what climate change smells like, or at least what one of its aromas is.

Lord of the bees

Mar 21, 2014

(Phys.org) —James Hung has collected more than 17,000 wild bees from coastal, desert and mountain areas of San Diego County. But many of his specimens bear little resemblance to the honey bees we normally ...

Recommended for you

Bloody souvenir not from decapitated French king: DNA

15 hours ago

Two centuries after the French people beheaded King Louis XVI and dipped their handkerchiefs in his blood, DNA analysis has thrown new doubt on the authenticity of one such rag kept as a morbid souvenir.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.