Kodak, Texas Instruments Simplify Camera Phone Design

Jul 11, 2005

Eastman Kodak Company is making it easier for camera phone manufacturers to build next-generation devices that offer improved image quality and multimedia capabilities. New KODAK CMOS image sensors for mobile phone and consumer digital still camera applications now seamlessly connect to OMAP 2 application processors from Texas Instruments Incorporated , a platform which delivers a foundation for mobile device manufacturers to provide the latest in mobile entertainment, productivity, and imaging applications on "All-in-One" mobile entertainment devices.

This combination will allow manufacturers to leverage TI's high-performance, power-efficient OMAP 2 platform with Kodak's leading pixel technology to bring new multimedia-rich mobile devices to market.

Kodak and TI have worked with Ingenient Technologies, a premier developer of multimedia product solutions, to develop a reference design that incorporates these advanced components. Availability of this reference design - utilizing Kodak's new CMOS image sensors and TI's OMAP 2 processors - will simplify adoption of these imaging components by designers of advanced mobile devices.

"Digital imaging has become a requirement for mobile phone and hand-held device manufacturers," said Chris McNiffe, General Manager of Kodak's Image Sensor Solutions group. "Together with TI's OMAP platform, we are making it easier for phone and consumer electronics manufacturers to build next-generation products that meet consumer demand for real-time, voice, data and multimedia tools. This is another example of Kodak's commitment to work with leading chip set manufacturers to facilitate the design of multimedia consumer imaging devices."

The five-megapixel KODAK KAC-5000 and three-megapixel KODAK KAC-3100 Image Sensors are fully integrated, high performance, 2.7 um pixel devices designed for mass-market consumer imaging applications. The new image sensors incorporate KODAK PIXELUX technology, a proprietary architecture that provides higher performance, improved image quality, and more innovative features than are available from current CIS devices (see release, "Kodak Advances CMOS Image Sensor Market with New Products for Camera Phones and Digital Still Cameras").

TI's OMAP 2 platform supports leading mobile entertainment applications, such as camera phones, video recording, and 3D gaming, allowing mobile device manufacturers to meet consumer expectations for a high-quality entertainment experience on the mobile phone. The OMAP 2 architecture is helping to re-define mobile entertainment by delivering a state-of-the-art multimedia and gaming experience.

"Kodak has a strong reputation for delivering high quality digital imaging devices, and we are excited that a reference design is now available that combines Kodak's new CMOS image sensors with TI's industry-leading OMAP processors," said Avner Goren, marketing director of TI's Cellular Systems Business. "With this powerful combination, manufacturers will be able to bring new features and capabilities to cell phones as we see the imaging, communications and the electronic markets converge."

"The combination of Kodak's imaging expertise with TI's application processor strengths is very compelling," said Sami Levi, President and CEO, Ingenient Technologies, Inc. "With a reference design in place, manufacturers now have a clear path to use these powerful components to bring advanced digital imaging and multimedia capabilities to new portable devices."

The KAC-3100 and KAC-5000 image sensors are both currently sampling.

Explore further: Microsoft beefs up security protection in Windows 10

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Algolux tackles optics challenges in smartphones

Sep 05, 2014

Algolux is a company aiming to tackle blurring problems through computational optics. Algolux said its efforts are presently focused on smartphones and tablets. One can appreciate how this company sees their ...

Season's new phones are all about selfie image

Sep 04, 2014

Visit any tourist destination, and you're bound to see individuals and groups taking photos of themselves for sharing on social media. It's a declaration to the world that they were there.

Recommended for you

Microsoft beefs up security protection in Windows 10

18 hours ago

What Microsoft users in business care deeply about—-a system architecture that supports efforts to get their work done efficiently; a work-centric menu to quickly access projects rather than weather readings ...

US official: Auto safety agency under review

Oct 24, 2014

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized ...

Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

Oct 24, 2014

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand ...

Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

Oct 24, 2014

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.

Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

Oct 24, 2014

An Estonian man who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

Magic Leap moves beyond older lines of VR

Oct 24, 2014

Two messages from Magic Leap: Most of us know that a world with dragons and unicorns, elves and fairies is just a better world. The other message: Technology can be mindboggingly awesome. When the two ...

User comments : 0