Canon develops world's first 120 megapixels APS-H-size CMOS image sensor

Aug 26, 2010
Canon's newly developed CMOS sensor
Canon's newly developed CMOS sensor, featuring approx. 120 megapixels

Canon announced today that it has developed an APS-H-size CMOS image sensor that delivers an image resolution of approximately 120 megapixels (13,280 x 9,184 pixels), the world's highest level of resolution for its size.

Compared with Canon's highest-resolution commercial CMOS sensor of the same size, comprising approximately 16.1 million pixels, the newly developed sensor features a pixel count that, at approximately 120 million pixels, is nearly 7.5 times larger and offers a 2.4-fold improvement in resolution.

With CMOS sensors, while high-speed readout for high pixel counts is achieved through parallel processing, an increase in parallel-processing signal counts can result in such problems as signal delays and minor deviations in timing. By modifying the method employed to control the readout circuit timing, Canon successfully achieved the high-speed readout of sensor signals. As a result, the new CMOS sensor makes possible a maximum output speed of approximately 9.5 frames per second, supporting the continuous shooting of ultra-high-resolution images.

Canon's newly developed also incorporates a Full HD (1,920 x 1,080 pixels) video output capability. The sensor can output Full HD video from any approximately one-sixtieth-sized section of its total surface area.

Images captured with Canon's newly developed approximately 120-megapixel CMOS , even when cropped or digitally magnified, maintain higher levels of definition and clarity than ever before. Additionally, the sensor enables image confirmation across a wide image area, with Full HD video viewing of a select portion of the overall frame.

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kevinrtrs
3 / 5 (2) Aug 26, 2010
The pixel densities are actually not that stringent - working out to about 23Mp/cm squared [correct me if I'm wrong]. This is still way better then the 37-40Mp/cm sq found in common Point and shoot cameras.
Hence the noise figures should be quite reasonable for such an amazing number of pixels.
I'd really like to see what ISO levels they can reasonably push it to.

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