States agree new funding, schedule for nuclear fusion plan

Jul 28, 2010
The European Union and six states backing a multi-billion-dollar nuclear fusion project said they had reached a deal on the financing and timetable for the experimental reactor.

The European Union and six states backing a multi-billion-dollar nuclear fusion project said Wednesday they had reached a deal on the financing and timetable for the experimental reactor.

An explosion in costs had cast a cloud over the (ITER), which aims to make the process that fuels the sun a practical energy source on Earth.

ITER, based at Cadarache in southern France, was set up by the EU, which has a 45 percent share, China, India, South Korea, Japan, Russia and the US to research a clean and limitless alternative to dwindling fossil fuel reserves.

ITER's governing council reached the deal after a two-day meeting in Cadarache at which Europe pledged to provide additional financing of a maximum 6.6 billion euros (8.5 billion dollars), it said in a statement.

It also formalised a decision to abandon its goal of 2018 to obtain the first plasma and set November 2019 as its new target.

entails forcing together the nuclei of light atomic elements in a super-heated plasma, held in a doughnut-shaped chamber called a , so that they make heavier elements and in so doing release energy.

"We are now entering a decisive phase in the ITER project," said Evgeny Velikhov of the ITER governing council.

The meeting also named Japanese physicist Osamu Motojima as ITER's new director-general, to replace his compatriot Kaname Ikeda.

The total estimated bill for the EU has doubled to 7.2 billion euros (9.2 billion dollars), with the overall cost now reckoned to be around 15 billion euros.

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User comments : 13

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Jigga
3 / 5 (8) Jul 28, 2010
I can just ask, why cheap Prof. Arata experiments weren't attempted to replicate after one year.

http://nextbigfut...eat.html

Here's a video of hot spots, created by fusion nuclei, as observed in thermocamera. A few dollars experiment, again:

http://www.lenr-c...Navy.htm]http://www.lenr-c...Navy.htm[/url]

LHC is over nine billions project for searching of ellusive Higgs boson with zero practical significance. Why we cannot organize a six billions project for research of cold fusion?

For those truly interested in the current state of research around cold fusion go to http://www.lenr-canr.org. Warning, this is real physics, with real QM equations, real Condensed Matter Physics, and a lot of real information.

http://www.lenr-c...Navy.htm]http://www.lenr-c...Navy.htm[/url]

One replicated Italian LENR experiment generated more excess power than all of the hot fusion experiments combined (total output was less than 20 Watt hours).
Jigga
1.8 / 5 (5) Jul 28, 2010
"New Energy Technology" symposium includes nearly 50 presentations describing the latest discoveries on the topic.

http://www.physor...829.html
DickWilhelm
3.8 / 5 (4) Jul 28, 2010
I'm glad funding is still available to these projects. With 3 solid designs out in the wild I have hope that we'll actually have this technology "within 50 years."
topor
Jul 29, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
alq131
5 / 5 (5) Jul 29, 2010
It would seem to me that like quantum tunnelling, there is a probability that two hydrogen atoms will spontaneously fuse. Though that probability is exceedingly small and not likely to generate sufficient events (in cold fusion) to be at all feasible as a source of useful power. It might be less of a question about whether or not cold fusion can occur, but that it can't occur in useful quantities. Hot fusion has more potential to generate more events and more power...not to foment the fusion holywar...
Javinator
not rated yet Jul 29, 2010
The total estimated bill for the EU has doubled to 7.2 billion euros (9.2 billion dollars), with the overall cost now reckoned to be around 15 billion euros.


Comparable to the price of a brand new nuclear power plant.
DoubleD
not rated yet Jul 29, 2010
The total estimated bill for the EU has doubled to 7.2 billion euros (9.2 billion dollars), with the overall cost now reckoned to be around 15 billion euros.

Comparable to the price of a brand new nuclear power plant.

EU portion was 45% of construction costs. With the remaining participants in ITER paying about 9% each. That puts total ITER cost at about $20B USD. You can get a single unit Gen III+ PWR for more like $6B USD. Jordanians bought 4 Gen III plants from the Koreans for $20B.
Javinator
not rated yet Jul 29, 2010
Depends on whether or not the country deems it necessary to factor in the liability costs for the reactor and the nuclear policies of the country in question.

Similar reactors can cost wildly more in some countries than others. A recent Ontario nuclear reactor bid in which the province of Ontario required the inclusion of nuclear liabilities in the price tag were estimated around $26B
Nik_2213
not rated yet Jul 30, 2010
The joker in pack may yet be Polywell fusion, at a fraction of price of an ITER/Tokomak installation.

FWIW, the problem with most designs of fission reactors is their accessibility. They need fuel-rods swapping and shipping. Smaller, 'sealed for life' reactors don't seem to have same efficiency-- But their reduced liabilities may win out...
rbrtwjohnson
not rated yet Jul 30, 2010
Investing all that money on ITER flawed concept is a total nonsense. Such resources could be better applied on well-conceived fusion concepts.
http://en.wikiped..._Reactor
MaxwellsDemon
5 / 5 (1) Jul 30, 2010
The joker in pack may yet be Polywell fusion, at a fraction of price of an ITER/Tokomak installation.


The tragedy with Polywell research is the publishing embargo imposed upon it by the military. Secrecy impedes progress, and the last thing we need to be doing is impeding progress in alternative energy R&D that could potentially revolutionize global civilization.
MaxwellsDemon
5 / 5 (1) Jul 30, 2010
Investing all that money on ITER flawed concept is a total nonsense. Such resources could be better applied on well-conceived fusion concepts.


It's not a mistake to fund any reasonable avenues of fusion experimentation, given the enormous stakes. But I think it is a concern when an experimental machine is being pitched as a viable reactor before we have tangible proof that it will work as a power plant.

Until someone somewhere has a fusion reactor that's commercially viable, it would be wise to generously fund and staff alternate reactor designs, rather than put all of our eggs in the ITER/tokamak basket.
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (1) Jul 30, 2010
It would seem to me that like quantum tunnelling, there is a probability that two hydrogen atoms will spontaneously fuse. Though that probability is exceedingly small and not likely to generate sufficient events (in cold fusion) to be at all feasible as a source of useful power. It might be less of a question about whether or not cold fusion can occur, but that it can't occur in useful quantities. Hot fusion has more potential to generate more events and more power...not to foment the fusion holywar...

That is the first logical explanation I've heard attempting to describe potentials within CF. Would also explain the dubious results of most experiments and the inability of most to account for what is actually occuring.
yempski
not rated yet Aug 02, 2010
I predict that a pulsed, dense plasma focus device will achieve unity before ITER is completed at 0.01% of the cost.

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