Sao Paulo will build Temple of Solomon replica

Jul 22, 2010
The Western Wall (C), part of the Temple Mount in east Jerusalem. Brazil will build a replica of Jerusalem's destroyed Temple of Solomon in eastern Sao Paulo, in a four-year, 113-million dollar construction project, local media said Wednesday.

Brazil will build a replica of Jerusalem's destroyed Temple of Solomon in eastern Sao Paulo, in a four-year, 113-million dollar construction project, local media said Wednesday.

The mega-church, made by the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, will measure 126-by-104 meters (yards) and stand 55 meters high. It will have a 12-floor indoor capacity for 10,000 people, said Agencia Folha news agency.

It will be made of stones cut exactly like those of the original , which first went up in 960 BC, was destroyed by the Babylonians in 587 BC, rebuilt and destroyed again by the Romans in the year 70. The Wailing Wall is its only remains.

City authorities have already approved the contruction project for the Bras neighborhood, the agency said.

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OdinsAcolyte
1 / 5 (1) Aug 05, 2010
If they want this to work they must perform all prep work off site and have only the sound of 'praise' present at the construction site. That would include no machinery

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