The IBEX Ribbon: Are we in for a new era in the Sun's voyage through the Galaxy?

May 26, 2010
The Sun traveling through the Galaxy happens to cross at the present time a blob of gas about ten light-years across, with a temperature of 6-7 thousand degrees kelvin. This so-called Local Interstellar Cloud is immersed in a much larger expanse of a million-degree hot gas, named the Local Bubble. The energetic neutral atoms (ENA) are generated by charge exchange at the interface between the two gaseous media. ENA can be observed provided the Sun is close enough to the interface. The apparent Ribbon of ENA discovered by the IBEX satellite can be explained by a geometric effect: one observes many more ENA by looking along a line-of-sight almost tangent to the interface than by looking in the perpendicular direction. (Source: SRC/Tentaris,ACh/Maciej Frolow)

Is the Sun going to enter soon a million-degree galactic cloud of interstellar gas? Scientists from the Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Los Alamos Labs, Southwest Research Institute, and Boston University suggest that the Ribbon of enhanced emissions of Energetic Neutral Atoms, discovered last year by a NASA Small Explorer satellite IBEX, could be explained by a geometric effect coming up because of approach of the Sun to the boundary between the Local Cloud of interstellar gas and another cloud of a very hot gas called the Local Bubble. If this hypothesis is correct, IBEX is catching matter from a hot neighboring interstellar cloud, which the Sun might enter in a hundred years.

First full-sky maps of the emissions of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA), obtained last year by a Small Explorer IBEX, showed a surprising arc-like feature called the Ribbon. This astonishing discovery was later announced by NASA as one of the most important findings in space exploration made in 2009. Shortly after the discovery six hypotheses were proposed to explain the Ribbon, all of them predicting its relation to processes going on within the or in its neighborhood. In a paper recently published in the , a Polish-US team of scientists led by Prof. Stan Grzedzielski from the Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, Poland, offers a different explanation. “We observe the Ribbon - says Grzedzielski - because the Sun is approaching a boundary between our Local Cloud of and another cloud of a very hot and turbulent gas”.

Energetic Neutral Atoms, registered by IBEX detectors, are born out of ions (protons) speeding from the very hot Local Bubble when they exchange charge with the relatively cool atoms “evaporating” from the Local . The newly created ENA have no and therefore can dash freely in straight lines from their birth site, oblivious of the impeding magnetic fields. Some of them may reach Earth orbit and be detected by IBEX. “Had the Ribbon ENA been created at the boundaries of the heliosphere, their birth site would be relatively nearby, within just a couple of hundreds of astronomical units - explains Dr Andrzej Czechowski from SRC PAS, one of the co-authors of the paper. “According to our hypothesis, they are born much, much farther away.”

The team of Polish and US scientists suggests that the Ribbon ENA are born by electrical charge exchange between the atoms which “evaporate” from the Local Interstellar Cloud into the nearby Local Bubble of a very hot and fully ionized gas. The Local Bubble is probably a remnant of a series of supernova explosions that occurred a few million years ago and thus is not only very hot (at least million degree Kelvin), but also turbulent. The protons in the Local Bubble nearby to the boundary with the Local Cloud snatch electrons from the neutral atoms and run away in all directions, some of them reaching IBEX. “If our hypothesis is correct, then we are catching atoms that originate from an interstellar cloud that is different from ours” - marvels Dr. Maciej Bzowski, Co-Investigator of the mission and head of the Polish IBEX team. But since the creation of such ENA atoms is occurring throughout the entire boundary layer between the clouds, why do we see the Ribbon? “It’s a purely geometrical effect, which we observe because the Sun is presently just in the right place, within a thousand of astronomical units from the cloud boundary - says Grzedzielski. “If the cloud-cloud boundary is flat, or better slightly extruded towards the Sun, then it appears the thinnest towards the center of the Ribbon and thicker at the sides, right where we see the edge of the Ribbon. If we were farther away from the boundary, we would see no Ribbon, because all the ENAs would be re-ionized and dispersed in the intervening gas of the Local Cloud.”

The model developed by the Polish-US team suggests that the boundary between the Local Cloud and the Local Bubble might be not within a few light years from the Sun, as it was believed earlier, but within just a thousand of astronomical units, a thousand-fold closer. This might mean that the Solar System could enter the million-degree Local Bubble cloud as early as the next century. “Nothing unusual, the Sun frequently traverses various clouds of interstellar gas during its galactic journey” - comments Grzedzielski. Such clouds are of very low density, much lower than the best vacuum obtained in the Earth labs. Once in, the heliosphere will reform and may shrink a little, the level of cosmic radiation entering the magnetosphere may rise a bit, but nothing more. “Perhaps future generations will have to learn how to better harden their space hardware against stronger radiation” - muses Grzedzielski.

is the latest in NASA's series of low-cost, rapidly developed Small Explorers space missions. Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, TX, leads and developed the mission with a team of US and international partners. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., manages the Explorers Program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington DC.

Explore further: Quest for extraterrestrial life not over, experts say

More information: S. Grzedzielski, M. Bzowski, A. Czechowski, H. O. Funsten, D. J. McComas, and N. A. Schwadron, “A POSSIBLE GENERATION MECHANISM FOR THE IBEX RIBBON FROM OUTSIDE THE HELIOSPHERE” Astrophysical Journal Letters, vol. 715 no 2, pp L84, 2010, doi: 10.1088/2041-8205/715/2/L84

Provided by Polish Academy of Sciences

4.7 /5 (9 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Quest for extraterrestrial life not over, experts say

Apr 18, 2014

The discovery of an Earth-sized planet in the "habitable" zone of a distant star, though exciting, is still a long way from pointing to the existence of extraterrestrial life, experts said Friday. ...

Continents may be a key feature of Super-Earths

Apr 18, 2014

Huge Earth-like planets that have both continents and oceans may be better at harboring extraterrestrial life than those that are water-only worlds. A new study gives hope for the possibility that many super-Earth ...

Exoplanets soon to gleam in the eye of NESSI

Apr 18, 2014

(Phys.org) —The New Mexico Exoplanet Spectroscopic Survey Instrument (NESSI) will soon get its first "taste" of exoplanets, helping astronomers decipher their chemical composition. Exoplanets are planets ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

LuckyBrandon
not rated yet May 28, 2010
And what impact will this have on earth? Maybe I missed it in the article....
yyz
5 / 5 (1) May 29, 2010
"the level of cosmic radiation entering the magnetosphere may rise a bit, but nothing more."

For space missions in the solar system additional radiation hardening may be advisable.

Gee, I would have thought neutron repulsion could somehow explain this finding better. ;)
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (1) May 29, 2010
Well this is certainly interesting. We know that heightened cosmic radiation can result in an increase in ionizing radiation within the solar system. Ionizing radiation has a dramatic effect on electromagnetic waves as well as DNA. Our communication methods may be slightly affected but, I doubt in 100 years that will be a concern.

What my greater question is, would passing through a highly charged medium of this sort potentially be involved with the periodic explosions of living diversity that we've seen in the past. In any event I'm sure further research will be quite intriguing.

More news stories

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...

UAE reports 12 new cases of MERS

Health authorities in the United Arab Emirates have announced 12 new cases of infection by the MERS coronavirus, but insisted the patients would be cured within two weeks.