US secretary sees clean energy tie-ups in Indonesia

May 25, 2010
An Indonesian power-plant worker. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said the United States was keen to develop clean-energy partnerships with Indonesia, a leading energy producer, ahead of a visit by President Barack Obama.

Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said on Tuesday the United States was keen to develop clean-energy partnerships with Indonesia, a leading energy producer, ahead of a visit by President Barack Obama.

With executives from 10 energy companies in tow, Locke held group meetings on clean energy with officials and business leaders in Jakarta, as well as talks with the government, said the US embassy.

Obama is expected to sign a "strategic partnership" with Indonesia when he visits in June, although the details have not been made known.

"The companies on this trade mission are at the vanguard of a movement to meet the world’s needs," Locke said in a statement.

"As they expand their presence in fast-growing countries like Indonesia they can help solve unprecedented energy and environmental challenges, while creating good-paying jobs for the people of America and Indonesia.

"That’s a win for everyone involved."

Companies represented in the delegation included General Electric, Lockheed Martin Global, Oshkosh Corporation, Peabody Energy and Pratt and Whitney Power Systems.

Indonesia is a top coal exporter, is the world's fourth most populous country with about 240 million people, and has the largest Muslim population, making it a strategic economic and diplomatic partner of the United States in Southeast Asia.

In addition to exporting "dirty" fuels like coal and gas, it is the top exporter of palm oil used in biofuels and is estimated to possess around 40 percent of the world's potential, or around 28,000 megawatts.

"Our meetings with Indonesian officials were productive, providing first-hand knowledge of clean tech opportunities and Indonesia’s business environment," Locke said.

"US companies on our trade mission look forward to pursuing new business opportunities in Indonesia that will benefit the economies of both our countries while creating a more sustainable environment."

Scientists blame the rapid expansion of plantations for the destruction of swathes of pristine rainforest, a process that emits vast amounts of greenhouse gas and destroys the habitats of endangered species like orangutans.

Explore further: Five anthropogenic factors that will radically alter northern forests in 50 years

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Indonesia aims to tap volcano power

Apr 24, 2010

Indonesia has launched an ambitious plan to tap the vast power of its volcanoes and become a world leader in geothermal energy, while trimming greenhouse gas emissions.

Alarm over fate of world's orangutans

Mar 26, 2007

A U.N. report details grave danger to the world's population of orangutans due to a booming palm oil industry in Malaysia and Indonesia.

US, Europe look to China for clean energy sales

May 17, 2010

(AP) -- U.S. leaders want China's clean energy boom to drive technology exports and are sending a sales mission to Beijing this week. But Beijing wants to create its own suppliers of wind, solar and other equipment and is ...

Indonesia launches eco-friendly investment index

Jun 09, 2009

The Indonesian stock exchange and a biodiversity foundation have launched an investment index to raise awareness of companies' environmental track records, an environmental group said.

European power plants boosting coal use

Apr 24, 2008

High oil and natural gas prices, coupled with increased demand, are driving Europe's return to coal-fired power plants, an industry official says.

Recommended for you

More, bigger wildfires burning western US, study shows

13 hours ago

Wildfires across the western United States have been getting bigger and more frequent over the last 30 years – a trend that could continue as climate change causes temperatures to rise and drought to become ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Six Nepalese dead, six missing in Everest avalanche

At least six Nepalese climbing guides have been killed and six others are missing after an avalanche struck Mount Everest early Friday in one of the deadliest accidents on the world's highest peak, officials ...

China says massive area of its soil polluted

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

There's something ancient in the icebox

Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised ...

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

Scientists tether lionfish to Cayman reefs

Research done by U.S. scientists in the Cayman Islands suggests that native predators can be trained to gobble up invasive lionfish that colonize regional reefs and voraciously prey on juvenile marine creatures.

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

(HealthDay)—A pit bull attack in July 2013 left a 19-year-old woman with her left ear ripped from her head, leaving an open wound. After preserving the ear, the surgical team started with a reconnection ...