NASA: All on track for Friday launch of Atlantis

May 13, 2010 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
NASA employees from the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., pose for a photo near the space shuttle Atlantis Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The final launch of Atlantis is planned for Friday afternoon. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)

(AP) -- Everything seems to be going NASA's way for launching space shuttle Atlantis on Friday.

Atlantis is set to blast off at 2:20 p.m. on its final voyage. Forecasters say there is a 70 percent chance of good weather. Low clouds are the only concern.

The shuttle and its six astronauts will deliver a Russian compartment to the . The chamber is filled with 3,000 pounds of U.S. supplies, including food and laptop computers. It will be the first - and last - time a shuttle carries a Russian module to the orbiting lab. Only two other shuttle flights remain.

Once the shuttles are retired, will leave station deliveries to commercial companies and other countries, and focus on trips to asteroids and Mars.

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