Countdown begins for shuttle Atlantis' last flight

May 11, 2010 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
STS-132 crew members, from left, Mission Specialists Michael Good, Garrett Reisman, Pilot Dominic Antonelli, Commander Kenneth Ham, and Mission Specialists Stephen Bowen and Piers Sellers pose for a group photo after arriving Monday, May 10, 2010, at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The final launch of the space shuttle Atlantis is planned for Friday afternoon. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

(AP) -- NASA is counting down to the final launch of space shuttle Atlantis.

Atlantis is set to blast off Friday afternoon on its last trip to the International Space Station. The countdown clocks began ticking Tuesday.

Forecasters put the odds of good launch weather at 70 percent.

The six assigned to the mission arrived at Kennedy Space Center on Monday evening. Atlantis will deliver spare parts and supplies to the .

NASA will wrap up the shuttle program this fall. Two more missions are planned, by Discovery and Endeavour. test director Steve Payne says the launch team is savoring the moments while it can.

Atlantis' launch on Friday is 2:20 p.m.

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vivcollins
not rated yet May 11, 2010
Bon chance Atlantis, bon voyage

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