Toshiba Introduces New High Areal Density 2.5-inch 750GB HDDs

Mar 26, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Toshiba Corporation today announced two additions to its 5,400 RPM line of 2.5-inch HDDs featuring industry-leading storage capacities. In the standard 9.5 millimeter-high, two-platter design, the MK7559GSXP HDD incorporates both the industry's highest areal density and capacity at 750GB. Sample shipments will start from April, 2010.

The MK7559GSXP HDD features an of 839.1Mbit/mm2, making it ideal for mobile applications in which capacity is key, including computers and external HDDs. This HDD is well-suited for devices that value high capacity in a smaller footprint with improved acoustic performance and lower power operation compared to larger form factor HDDs. Those applications include all-in-one desktops, televisions and set top boxes.

Toshiba also introduced a new three-platter 12.5-millimeter-high platform with the MK1059GSM with 1TB of storage. This capacity point was predominantly supported by larger form factor 3.5-inch HDDs until the introduction of high-end 2.5-inch solutions, providing low-power, space-saving opportunities to system manufacturers looking to differentiate or update their products.

The MK7559GSXP efficiency is about 14% less than the previous generation (MK6465GSX, 640GB). These products also adhere to Toshiba's environmental initiatives in their use of techniques and components that reduce reliance on harmful chemicals, materials and compounds.

The new products offerings expand Toshiba's mobile HDD product line into the highest-capacity segment of the 2.5-inch HDD market and represent the company's first mobile HDD platforms developed with the combined engineering resources from the integration of Fujitsu's HDD business, which Toshiba acquired last fall.

Explore further: Successful read/write of digital data in fused silica glass with high recording density

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mark0101
not rated yet Mar 26, 2010
5,400 RPM? Seriously?
Quantum_Conundrum
not rated yet Mar 26, 2010
The denser the data storage the slower the max read spead, which should be obvious. If your data bits are stored in a space half the size, then it takes twice as long to make an accurate read...
Scalziand
not rated yet Mar 26, 2010
The denser the data storage the slower the max read spead, which should be obvious. If your data bits are stored in a space half the size, then it takes twice as long to make an accurate read...


That's not true for magnetic platter hard drives. It's actually the other way around; a higher areal density increases the read rate because for a given spindle speed, more bits will pass under the read head in given time.
birdbrainz
not rated yet Mar 30, 2010
There are a few reasons for the slower spindle speed at very high densities: 1. It's easier to write data at lower data rates. 2. For a constant bit density, lower bit rates mean better SNR as the noise BW is smaller. 3. It's easier to design the mechanics and servo system for more precise head positioning. 4. Lower heat overall.