Nevada wild-horse roundup death toll rises

Mar 20, 2010

(AP) -- Activists in Nevada are questioning the rising death toll from a government roundup of wild horses from the range north of Reno.

U.S. Bureau of Land Management spokeswoman JoLynn Worley says 77 mustangs involved in the Calico Mountains Complex gather have died so far - 70 at a Fallon facility where they were taken and the rest at the roundup site.

That's nearly double the 39 horses that had died when the roundup of 1,922 concluded on Feb. 5.

Horse advocates are pressing the government for measures to deal with the situation.

Worley attributes the deaths mostly to the poor body condition of mares that were sent to Fallon, where the are being prepared for adoption or transfer to pastures in the Midwest.

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jerryd
1 / 5 (1) Mar 20, 2010

They should all be killed and sold for food to Europe and replaced with Bison of any that people don't want.

Let those who want to save them have 6 months to catch them, then sell what is left for food.
ormondotvos
Mar 21, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Rynox77
not rated yet Mar 22, 2010
wow, I live in Indiana and had no idea wild horses still existed.