Hunters kill 20 wolves in first Swedish hunt in 45 years

Jan 02, 2010
Hunter Sune Johansson (Down center) weights a female wolf after it was shot during a wolf hunt near Kristinehamn.

Hunters shot dead 20 wolves in Sweden on Saturday on the first day of the country's first authorised wolf hunt in 45 years, according to a toll issued by Swiss media.

The Swedish environment authority had issued permits for 27 of the animals to be killed between January 2 and February 15 in five central and southwestern regions: 10 percent of the Sweden's entire wolf population.

Parliament decided in October to limit the wolf population to a maximum of 210 and 20 packs for the next five years.

The wolf population has grown steadily from near zero in the 1970s and poses a problem for farmers, who lose livestock in attacks. They are also increasingly seen in urban areas including suburbs of Stockholm.

Sheep farmer Kenneth Holmstrom told the Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter that he had lost 32 sheep in 2005 in just two wolf attacks.

"The wolf has the right to exist in the forests and in the fields but it must be better controlled," he said.

"It does not have a natural enemy and it multiplies quickly."

Swedish conservation groups have objected the hunt violates European Union legislation on species and habitats.

There were about 150 in Sweden in 2005. The number rose to between 182 and 217 last winter and more cubs produced since then, according to the Swedish .

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Roj
not rated yet Jan 03, 2010
Swedish conservation groups have objected the hunt violates European Union legislation on species and habitats.


Thought some world regions have arranged compensation for farmers when endangered predators destroy livestock.
otto1923
not rated yet Jan 03, 2010
Lycan lover-
How much compensation for a pet, a child, or granny? When nature can no longer correct the natural balance, mankind must assume the role. Send them to the pound.
Ulg
not rated yet Jan 10, 2010
"It does not have a natural enemy and it multiplies quickly."

Well food supply and hunting ground are directly controlling their population, we do not need to interfere.

Oh but when the food runs they will get nutty, I see so the answer is the spend a thousand bucks on a rifle and maybe another couple hundred on some neat gear to maybe shoot an animal that might at some point in its lifetime even see your farm. How about putting up a electric fence? You know something that might actually ensure that your livestock are protected, and from other animals too (sweden has brown bears for example)

"How much compensation ..."

How about personal responsibility, if you live around wolves dont put yourself in danger and take preparations, learn how to react, when body language fails there is pepper sprays formulated and designed for canines.

If I can go years without getting mugged on NYC subways at night- you can go through life without a negative interaction with a wolf.
awolfman
not rated yet Feb 13, 2010
Lycan lover-
How much compensation for a pet, a child, or granny? When nature can no longer correct the natural balance, mankind must assume the role. Send them to the pound.


You mean when on of these are SHOT by one of the 200,000 hunters roaming around the Swedish woods looking to kill anything that moves ?
If you are to believe fairytales, PLEASE include the other characters of the saga
like trolls, dragons and maybe santa claus ?
Roj
not rated yet Feb 16, 2010
Shaun Ellis had some success keeping wolves away from a Polish farmer's livestock by playing howling sounds from a boom box. Further research may be warranted. See section on documentary "The Wolfman" in the UK, or "A Man Among Wolves" in the US.
http://en.wikiped...earcher)

Unrelated field use of a howel box called the "Wolf whistle" is shown to have a similar effect.
http://www.the-sc...y/56166/
"placed cameras near the howlboxes to see if the wolves would approach the devices. None did,"