China rapidly catching up in research impact

Dec 17, 2009

Data from a recent Thomson Reuters study show that Chinese research output has increased from just over 20,000 papers in 1998 to nearly 112,000 in 2008.

Faculty of 1000, which selects only the top 2% of the biomedical literature, has evaluated more than 530 papers from Chinese universities and institutes since 2001. While only 27 Chinese-authored papers were selected in 2004, this increased by over fourfold in 2008 and is set to be even higher in 2009.

Jane Hunter, Managing Director of Faculty of 1000, says,
"Recent statistics show that China could outstrip the US in terms of academic output in the next decade. Faculty of 1000 is excited to see the depth and quality of research coming out of the country."

Mark Danderson from the China Medical Tribune, a keen supporter of f1000, investigated the scope of Chinese research. He found

  • the number of PubMed articles by Chinese authors increased by nearly tenfold from 4,891 in 1999 to 46,842 in 2008
  • in 1999, 190 of these papers focused on human clinical trials; rising to 1264 by 2008
  • China had proportionally more papers classed as 'Changes clinical practice' in f1000 Medicine than the USA (7.9% vs 6.8%, respectively).
Recent evaluations of papers from China have received high numbers of views on f1000.com and have garnered widespread media attention. A review of The symbolic power of money: reminders of money alter and physical pain by Xinyue Zhou et al. of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou featured in the Top 10 Most Viewed articles on f1000 Medicine articles in September, and was reported in the as well as the UK's Daily Telegraph and Daily Mail.

Professor Sun-Wei Guo, Faculty of 1000 Member for Women's Health and Director of the Institute of Obstetric and Gynecologic Research at Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, said,
"Universities and research institutions in are increasingly publishing academic papers in English to show the quality of medical research in this country on an international stage."

Zhu Chen of the Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation Laboratory, Shanghai Institute of Hematology, said,
"Faculty of 1000 is an important tool in promoting our institutions' papers and showcasing how much Chinese research is changing clinical practice around the world."

Explore further: Engineers develop gift guide for parents

More information: -- The report on China's research output by Thomson Reuters is available at researchanalytics.thomsonreuters.com/grr/
-- The review of Zhou's article is available free at www.f1000medicine.com/article/… wty080l4q/id/1163818

Provided by Faculty of 1000: Biology and Medicine

5 /5 (4 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Rich people don't need friends

Sep 16, 2009

In a paper evaluated by f1000 Medicine, six studies tested relationships between reminders of money, social exclusion and physical pain.

China becomes a physics powerhouse

Aug 01, 2008

Judged by the astonishing increase in journal papers written by scientists in China, there can be little doubt that China is finding its place as one of the world's scientific power houses. Michael Banks, Physics World's News E ...

U.S. scientific papers slip

Aug 01, 2005

If current trends continue, the Asia Pacific region might outstrip the United States in scientific papers published by 2011.

Doubts cast on credibility of some published clinical trials

Jul 02, 2009

Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) are considered the 'gold standard' research method for assessing new medical treatments. But research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Trials shows that the design of a r ...

Recommended for you

Engineers develop gift guide for parents

Nov 21, 2014

Faculty and staff in Purdue University's College of Engineering have come up with a holiday gift guide that can help engage children in engineering concepts.

Former Brown dean whose group won Nobel Prize dies

Nov 20, 2014

David Greer, a doctor who co-founded a group that won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for working to prevent nuclear war and who helped transform the medical school at Brown University, has died. He was 89.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.