Former Ida a huge rainmaker, causing flooding in the Mid-Atlantic

Nov 13, 2009
This is a photo of the flooding during high tide today, Nov. 12, at the Parkers Creek boat ramp. The photo looks out over the Parkers Creek Marsh on the sea side of Accomack County, Va. Credit: Betty Flowers

The coastal low, formerly known as Ida, is currently quasi-stationary off the North Carolina coast, adding more rain on top of what it has already brought. The low is creating serious flooding from northeast North Carolina to coastal Virginia.

A retired employee of NASA's Wallops Flight Facility provided photographs of flooded roadways in Accomack County, Virginia, and reported trees down and other damages this afternoon.

What's interesting is that Ida is a stronger system now as a coastal low pressure system than when it made landfall in Dauphin Island, Alabama as a tropical storm. At that time, its minimum central pressure was 999 millibars. Today, its minimum central pressure is 992 millibars.

At 4 p.m. ET the center of remnants of Ida was located near latitude 35.2 north and longitude 75.8 west, that's 15 miles west of Hatteras, North Carolina and 65 miles south-southeast of Elizabeth City, North Carolina. The low has near 45 mph with higher gusts. Some of those higher gusts have been reported in Hampton, Virginia, and in Accomack County, Virgina.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-12 captured this view of the coastal low pressure area on November 12 at 3:01 p.m. ET, as it continued drenching the Mid-Atlantic. GOES satellites are operated by NOAA, and images are created through the NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. Credit: NASA GOES Project

The low is expected to sit where it is off the North Carolina coast through early Friday before slowly moving eastward. The GOES-12 noticed that the former Ida hasn't moved much since this morning.

GOES-12 is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NASA's GOES Project that creates GOES imagery is located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

NOAA's Hydrometeorological Prediction Center said this afternoon that "additional heavy rains of 2 to 4 inches are expected through eastern Virginia...eastern and southern Maryland...Delaware...and New Jersey through Friday morning. Isolated totals around 6 inches are possible."

Source: JPL/NASA (news : web)

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