NASA tries 2nd time to launch experimental rocket

Oct 28, 2009 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
The Ares I-X test rocket at Pad 39B is seen moments after the launch was scrubbed due to weather concerns at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

(AP) -- Bad weather was interfering with NASA's attempt to launch a new, experimental rocket for the second day in a row early Wednesday.

An estimated 154 lightning strikes were reported within a five-mile radius of the overnight. Launch controllers were retesting the Ares I-X rocket systems to make sure nothing was damaged. The extra work delayed Wednesday morning's liftoff. NASA had until noon to get the flying.

Tuesday's launch attempt was thwarted by clouds and wind. More of the same was expected Wednesday.

The Ares I-X is a precursor to the rockets NASA hopes to launch with astronauts to the and, ultimately, the moon. The White House may scrap it, however, in favor of other rockets and destinations.

NASA has invested $445 million in the test.

The first-stage booster will be recovered from the ocean for analysis.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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ScottyB
1 / 5 (1) Oct 28, 2009
I know it's not NASA's fault, but it would be nice to see a launch go on time for a change. :(
degojoey
Oct 28, 2009
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