Advance in 'nano-agriculture': Tiny stuff has huge effect on plant growth

Oct 21, 2009
Tomato seeds exposed to carbon nanotubes (right) sprouted and grew faster than unexposed seeds (left). Credit: The American Chemical Society

With potential adverse health and environmental effects often in the news about nanotechnology, scientists in Arkansas are reporting that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) could have beneficial effects in agriculture.

Their study, scheduled for the October issue of ACS Nano, found that tomato seeds exposed to CNTs germinated faster and grew into larger, heavier seedlings than other seeds. That growth-enhancing effect could be a boon for biomass production for plant-based biofuels and other agricultural products, they suggest.

Mariya Khodakovskaya, Alexandru Biris, and colleagues note that considerable scientific research is underway to use — wisps 1/50,000th the width of a human hair — in agriculture. The goals of "nano-agriculture" include improving the productivity of plants for food, fuel, and other uses.

The scientists report the first evidence that CNTs penetrate the hard outer coating of seeds, and have beneficial effects. Nanotube-exposed seeds sprouted up to two times faster than control and the seedlings weighed more than twice as much as the untreated plants. Those effects may occur because nanotubes penetrate the seed coat and boost water uptake, the researchers state. "This observed positive effect of CNTs on the seed germination could have significant economic importance for agriculture, horticulture, and the energy sector, such as for production of biofuels," they add.

More information: "Carbon Nanotubes Are Able To Penetrate Plant Seed Coat and Dramatically Affect Seed Germination and ", ACS Nano, http://pubs.acs.org/stoken/presspac/presspac/full/10.1021/nn900887m

Source: American Chemical Society (news : web)

Explore further: Physicists create new nanoparticle for cancer therapy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Can Nanotubes Help Your Garden Grow?

Oct 06, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- When we think of nanotubes, we often think of solar panels and physical science. However, it appears that nanotubes can also provide valuable help to plants as a fertilizer. Just add carbon ...

Carbon nanomaterials may disperse more widely in waterways

Dec 04, 2006

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) released to the environment in the coming era of industrial-scale production could spread through lakes, rivers and other waterways more widely than previously anticipated, scientists are reporting ...

Recommended for you

Physicists create new nanoparticle for cancer therapy

11 hours ago

A University of Texas at Arlington physicist working to create a luminescent nanoparticle to use in security-related radiation detection may have instead happened upon an advance in photodynamic cancer therapy.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Yulia_Rudy
not rated yet Oct 22, 2009
Excuse me... but am I seeing double?... Did you write about almost same experiment?
http://www.physor...714.html
abhiGHAJINI
not rated yet Nov 09, 2009
Could this lead to the artificiality of crops in the future in a race of production?

More news stories

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.