Circus billionaire hosts show aboard space station

Oct 11, 2009
Canada's first space tourist, Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte, gives closing remarks during his TV/Internet show from the International Space Station as seen on a screen at the Montreal performance Friday, Oct. 9, 2009 in Montreal. Laliberte, right, appears with from left: Canadian astronaut Bob Thirsk, Nicole Stott and Jeff Williams, of the USA, Frank DeWinne, from the European Space Agency, and Maxim Surayev, from Russia. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press - Paul Chiasson)

(AP) -- Canadian space tourist and circus billionaire Guy Laliberte mixed star power, science lectures, music and poetry in hosting a show from the International Space Station that was broadcast on television and the Internet.

People from around the world tuned in on Friday to the Cirque du Soleil founder, who brought his crusade to preserve the world's water resources down to Earth from his host's chair on the .

Former U.S. vice president Al Gore, U2 and Shakira were among the parade of entertainers and activists who participated back on Earth with acts performing in 14 cities on five continents.

The show was aimed at raising awareness for Laliberte's One Drop Foundation, which seeks to draw attention to the growing shortage of clean water.

One of the most anticipated segments of the evening was a chat between Laliberte and Bono, who was performing with U2 at a concert in Tampa, Fla.

"You are the first clown in space and we think it's a great idea for you to give us your perspective on our little planet while you're not on our little planet and instead looking down on it," Bono said. "How do we look from there, how does our little planet look, Guy?"

Laliberte replied that "planet Earth looks so great but also so fragile."

The event combined live and taped segments. Production costs for the multilingual show are estimated at between $6 million and $10 million - which is on top of the $35 million Laliberte paid to become Canada's first .

It was seen on the Internet beginning at 8 p.m EDT; 0000 GMT through the One Drop Foundation's Web site: http://www.onedrop.org .

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Red moon at night; stargazer's delight

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Russian spacecraft with circus tycoon lands safely

Oct 11, 2009

(AP) -- The Russian Soyuz capsule carrying Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte and two other space travelers landed safely in Kazakhstan on Sunday, ending the entertainment tycoon's mirthful space odyssey.

Craft carrying circus tycoon reaches space station

Oct 02, 2009

(AP) -- A Russian spacecraft docked Friday at the International Space Station to drop off Canadian circus billionaire Guy Laliberte - dubbed the first clown in space - along with an American astronaut and Russian cosmonaut.

Circus tycoon clowns around aboard space station

Oct 02, 2009

(AP) -- A Canadian circus billionaire boarded the International Space Station on Friday after a smooth ride up from Earth, and promptly played the entertainer by donning a red clown nose for a camera.

Canadian circus billionaire heads to space station

Sep 30, 2009

(AP) -- A Canadian circus tycoon, an American astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut blasted off in a spacecraft from the Kazakh steppe Wednesday on a journey to the International Space Station.

Recommended for you

Red moon at night; stargazer's delight

17 hours ago

Monday night's lunar eclipse proved just as delightful as expected to those able to view it. On the East Coast, cloudy skies may have gotten in the way, but at the National Science Foundation's National Optical ...

Meteorites yield clues to Martian early atmosphere

20 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Geologists who analyzed 40 meteorites that fell to Earth from Mars unlocked secrets of the Martian atmosphere hidden in the chemical signatures of these ancient rocks. Their study, published ...

Let's put a sailboat on Titan

23 hours ago

The large moons orbiting the gas giants in our solar system have been getting increasing attention in recent years. Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only natural satellite known to house a thick atmosphere. ...

Image: Rosetta's Philae lander snaps a selfie

23 hours ago

Philae is awake… and taking pictures! This image, acquired last night with the lander's CIVA (Comet nucleus Infrared and Visible Analyzer) instrument, shows the left and right solar panels of ESA's well-traveled ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...

Meteorites yield clues to Martian early atmosphere

(Phys.org) —Geologists who analyzed 40 meteorites that fell to Earth from Mars unlocked secrets of the Martian atmosphere hidden in the chemical signatures of these ancient rocks. Their study, published ...

Let's put a sailboat on Titan

The large moons orbiting the gas giants in our solar system have been getting increasing attention in recent years. Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only natural satellite known to house a thick atmosphere. ...

Net neutrality balancing act

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...