Taiwan scientists identify flood-tolerant gene in rice

Oct 11, 2009
This photos shows rice growing from bio-engineered soil aimed at enhancing its productivity at a trade show in Taipei in July 2009. A Taiwanese scientist has said her research team has found the gene that allows rice to grow under water and believes the breakthrough could help develop other flood-resistant crops.

A Taiwanese scientist has said her research team has found the gene that allows rice to grow under water and believes the breakthrough could help develop other flood-resistant crops.

The gene, named CIPK15, a type of enzyme, "allows seedlings to survive and continue to grow even when submerged in water," said Yu Su-mei, a research fellow at the Institute of Molecular Biology at Taiwan's Academia Sinica.

Yu said she believed the discovery would help breeders generate new rice varieties with greater seedling growth under flood-water, which would save on labour and use of pesticides, potentially benefiting the environment.

The study was published in the current issue of the Washington-based journal Science Signaling.

(c) 2009 AFP

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