Typhoon Melor and Tropical Storm Parma mean double trouble in the western Pacific

Oct 07, 2009
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Parma (lower left) and Typhoon Melor (top right) on Oct. 7. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

There's double-trouble in the Western Pacific with one typhoon and one tropical storm bringing soaking rains, dangerous surf and gusty winds to two different locations. Typhoon Melor is affecting the east coast of Japan and watches and warnings are up today. Further south, Tropical Storm Parma continues to rain on Luzon in the northern Philippines.

Typhoon Melor is currently affecting southern and bringing gusty winds, heavy rains and high waves there. High Wave and Gale Watches and warnings have been posted in Japan in the prefectures of Miyazaki and Kagoshima today.

At 11 a.m. EDT, Typhoon Melor had sustained winds near 75 knots (86 mph). It was located 350 nautical miles southwest of Tokyo, Japan, near 32.7 North and 135.4 East. Melor is moving northeast near 25 knots (28 mph) and is generating 30-foot high waves. At 11 a.m. EDT, the storm was almost due south of the city of Wakayama.

NASA's Aqua satellite captured cold thunderstorm cloud tops of both Parma (lower left) and Melor (top right) in this infrared image Oct. 7. Parma continues to rain on northern Luzon in the Philippines, while Melor is now bringing rains and winds over southern Japan. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Melor is currently becoming extra-tropical as it approaches Honshu. It will accelerate northeast to the west of and reemerge over the Pacific as a strong non-tropical low pressure system.

At 11 a.m. EDT on October 7, Parma had been downgraded to a with sustained winds near 35 knots (42 mph). Parma was located 225 nautical miles north-northeast of Manila, Philippines, near 18.1 North and 122.4 East. Parma has tracked north-northeastward at 4 mph. Parma is still generating waves up to 22 feet high.

Parma's forecast track is still somewhat questionable, as different computer forecast models take Parma on different tracks. However, forecasters at the U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center are forecasting Parma to slowly crawl from northeastern Luzon back across the northern island and finally into the South China Sea sometime on October 9. The slow movement across the northern Philippines means more unwelcome rain in the region over the next several days.

The Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Typhoon Melor as it was approaching Japan on Oct. 6 at 9:40 p.m. EDT. Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team

Warnings are posted in the Philippines today. Public storm warning signal 1 is in force in Batanes Group of Islands, Cagayan, Babuyan Island, Calayan Island, Ilocos Norte & Sur, Apayao, Abra, Kalinga, Mountain Province, Isabela, Ifugao, Nueva Vizcaya, Northern Aurora and Benguet.

An instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured both typhoons in one image. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) captured both Parma and Melor in a visible and infrared image October 7 at 0453 UTC (12:53 a.m. EDT) as Parma continues to rain on northern Luzon in the , while Melor is now bringing rains and winds over southern Japan.

The infrared imagery revealed that the cloud tops of Parma are not as cold as they are in Melor, indicating that Parma is a much weaker storm. Melor has some strong thunderstorms, where temperatures are colder than -63 Fahrenheit.

Infrared imagery has also shown that Tropical Storm Parma has made its track over Luzon, and is now back over the open waters of the Philippine Sea. Although Parma's track over land weakened the storm, the open waters are expected to power the storm's convection and thunderstorms back up. In fact, infrared imagery has shown that convection is already redeveloping near the low level center of the storm.

Source: JPL/NASA (news : web)

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