European astroparticle physicists to celebrate 100 years of cosmic ray experiments

Oct 02, 2009

From 10 to 17 October 2009, in France, Italy, Spain and many other countries, astroparticle physicists will meet the public to reveal some of the most exciting mysteries of the Universe. Within the first European Week of Astroparticle Physics, they will organise about 50 events all over Europe: open days, talks for the general public, exhibitions…

The first precursor experiments discovered cosmic ray radiation about a century ago. From 1909 to 1911, physicist Theodor Wulf tried to measure differences of radiation at different altitudes from the Netherlands to Switzerland, and even on top of the Eiffel Tower. In 1912, Victor Franz Hess measured a significant increase of radiation using a balloon for his experiments, flying up to 5000 meters. He was awarded the for "his discovery of cosmic radiation" in 1936.

Paris will honour astroparticle physics pioneers at the Montparnasse Tower—the highest building in Paris—which will become a real cosmic rays detector during the entire week. It will welcome the public for animations and meetings with scientists. At night a will link the ancient Paris Observatory and the Montparnasse Tower, flashing in syncronisation with the detection of cosmic rays.

In Czech Republic, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania… laboratories will open their doors or organise special events where physicists will meet the public.

Rome will celebrate astroparticle physics with opening on 27 October 2009 in Palazzo delle Esposizioni a large exhibition dedicated to astroparticle physics: "Astri e particelle. Le parole dell' Universo". It is the very first exhibition of this kind in Europe, highlighting challenges and techniques of astroparticle physics, a truly new astronomy.

New astronomy

While the roots of astroparticle physics date back one century ago, it has been developing strongly on the last 30 years, opening new windows to the Universe. Astroparticle physics aims to answer fundamental questions such as "What is ?", "What is the origin of cosmic rays?" or "What is the nature of gravity?". In underground laboratories or with specially designed telescopes, antennas and satellite experiments, astroparticle physicists employ new detection methods to hunt a wide range of cosmic particles, such as neutrinos, gamma rays, and cosmic rays.

Cosmic rays are tiny particles coming from Space. Created in the core of stars and other cosmic bodies, they reach the Earth, providing a lot of information about their sources and the Universe. Physicists and astronomers think that the of the highest energies come from the most violent phenomena in the Universe such as supernova explosions and black holes.

More information: Find here the programme of the European Week of astroparticle physics: europeanweek.astroparticle.org

Source: CERN

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omatumr
1 / 5 (3) Oct 04, 2009
European astroparticle physicists will find the energy source for cosmic rays if they study the basic interactions between nucleons in the nuclei of every atom right here:

Repulsive interactions between neutrons!

That is why "Cosmic rays are tiny particles . . . Created in the core of stars and other cosmic bodies."

The cores of the Sun, other ordinary stars, neutron stars, and imaginary "Black Holes" are made of neutrons.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Thecis
5 / 5 (2) Oct 05, 2009
One quick question.
If everything is explained with repulsive interactions between neutrons, how come that atoms are fairly stable?

Could you please state the conditions that are needed for neutrons to become repulsive. Please specifiy this in a few words in stead of referring to your papers. Frankly, I don't have the time to filter through numbers of articles. Im sure you are able to specify this in one comment or less.

Kind regards,
Thecis
yyz
5 / 5 (1) Oct 05, 2009
As if to highlight 100 years of study of cosmic rays, it seems the sun's current sunspot minimum is conducive to allowing a greater flux of cosmic rays into the solar system as reported here recently: http://www.physor...919.html . As mentioned in the article 'The cause of the surge is solar minimum, a deep lull in solar activity that began around 2007 and continues today. Researchers have long known that cosmic rays go up when solar activity goes down. Right now solar activity is as weak as it has been in modern times, setting the stage for what Mewaldt calls "a perfect storm of cosmic rays." '. Seems like a great time to study cosmic rays and their origins.
omatumr
1 / 5 (2) Oct 05, 2009
One quick question.
If everything is explained with repulsive interactions between neutrons, how come that atoms are fairly stable?

Could you please state the conditions that are needed for neutrons to become repulsive. Please specifiy this in a few words in stead of referring to your papers. Frankly, I don't have the time to filter through numbers of articles. Im sure you are able to specify this in one comment or less.

Kind regards,
Thecis


Rest mass data for every known nucleus reveals repulsive forces between neutrons. Google: "Attraction and repulsion of nucleons: Sources of stellar energy", Journal of Fusion Energy (2001) 19, 93-98 or send me an e-mail and I'll send you the rest mass data, plotted to reveal repulsive interactions between neutrons.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
omatumr@yahoo.com