Tropical Storm Koppu poised for China landfall

Sep 14, 2009
NASA's Terra satellite captured Tropical Storm Koppu on September 13 using infrared imagery from the moderate imaging spectroradiometer instrument and it revealed a well-organized tropical storm near the southeastern China coast. Credit: NASA, MODIS Rapid Response

The latest tropical storm in the western Pacific formed on Sunday, and is poised to make landfall in mainland China on Tuesday, near typhoon strength (74 mph). Two NASA satellites captured different views of its clouds.

Tropical Storm Koppu, the sixteenth tropical cyclone in the western Pacific Ocean, also deemed "16W," had sustained winds near 69 mph (60 knots) today, September 14. Koppu is expected to strengthen just a little more before it makes landfall in . It was centered near 20.6 north and 114.6 east, about 130 nautical miles south-southeast of Hong Kong, China. Koppu is forecast to move west-northwest near 10 mph and will make landfall on September 15. It is expected to dissipate within one or two days after landfall.

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Tropical Storm Koppu late last night at 03:20 UTC (11:20 p.m. EDT), and using infrared imagery from the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, it captured a well organized of the southeastern China coast. Landfall will bring heavy rains, heavy surf conditions along the coast and gusty winds.

AIRS captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Koppu's cold, high thunderstorm cloud tops on September 13, measuring temperatures as cold as -63 Fahrenheit. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Earlier, NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Koppu and used the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument to read the temperatures of the storm's at 1:41 a.m. EDT. AIRS showed very cold, high clouds, as cold or colder than -63 Fahrenheit.

Koppu will continue to track generally west-northwestward under the influence of the subtropical ridge until it makes landfall northwest of the Leizhou Peninsula during the day tomorrow.

Source: /Goddard Space Flight Center

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