Technology addiction disrupts teenage learning

Sep 10, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Technology addiction amongst teenagers is having a disruptive effect on their learning, according to new research published today by Cranfield School of Management (UK). Over a third (39.3%) of 11-18 year olds surveyed admitted that text shortcuts damaged the quality of their written English, particularly in terms of spelling.

Commenting on the results, Andrew Kakabadse, Professor of International Management Development at Cranfield School of Management said: “Our research shows that technology obsession hinders spelling skills, implicitly encourages , and disrupts classroom learning. Despite school policies restricting mobile phone usage, students use the phone frequently, with the majority making calls from the toilets. The mobile phone continues to be a prime channel of social communication during the day.”

The study also examined how different technologies were used in an education context. “Shockingly,” said Professor Andrew Kakabadse, “a high proportion of teenagers (59.2%) admitted to inserting information straight from the internet into schoolwork, without actually reading or changing it. Almost a third (28.5%) deemed this as acceptable practice despite recognising that such behaviour is considered plagiarism.”

The survey confirmed that access to technologies occurs at an early age with the emerging sequence being access to a computer before the age of eight, use of the internet between the ages of five and ten, use of a mobile phone between the ages of eight and ten and access to a social network between the ages of eleven and thirteen.

Over 60% of the respondents admitted to being “very” or “quite” addicted to the internet, while over 50% are addicted to their mobile phones. The report also revealed that students spend, on average, 1-2 hours a day on social network sites.

The full report, Techno addicts - young person addiction to technology is published by Cambridge-based Sigel Press as an electronic whitepaper download and is available at www.sigelpress.com/ .

Provided by Cranfield University

Explore further: Understanding the economics of human trafficking

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mobile phones help secondary pupils

Sep 11, 2008

Ask a teacher to name the most irritating invention of recent years and they will often nominate the mobile phone. Exasperated by the distractions and problems they create, many headteachers have ordered that pupils must ...

Wireless World: Love, Mom

May 12, 2006

This Mother's Day, show mom you really care. Send her a text message -- with love. Experts tell UPI's Wireless World that increasingly, moms are using text messaging and mobile phones to manage their communications with family ...

Inexpensive fun fuels text messaging growth

Jan 31, 2007

Fun technology coupled with economical pricing fuel young adults' burgeoning use of text messaging, according to new research conducted by the DeGroote School of Business at McMaster University.

Recommended for you

Local education politics 'far from dead'

19 hours ago

Teach for America, known for recruiting teachers, is also setting its sights on capturing school board seats across the nation. Surprisingly, however, political candidates from the program aren't just pushing ...

First grade reading suffers in segregated schools

19 hours ago

A groundbreaking study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) has found that African-American students in first grade experience smaller gains in reading when they attend segregated schools—but the ...

Why aren't consumers buying remanufactured products?

21 hours ago

Firms looking to increase market share of remanufactured consumer products will have to overcome a big barrier to do so, according to a recent study from the Penn State Smeal College of Business. Findings from faculty members ...

Expecting to teach enhances learning, recall

21 hours ago

People learn better and recall more when given the impression that they will soon have to teach newly acquired material to someone else, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

Understanding the economics of human trafficking

Jul 28, 2014

Although Europe is one of the strictest regions in the world when it comes to guaranteeing the respect of human rights, the number of people trafficked to or within the EU still amounts to several hundred ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

docknowledge
not rated yet Sep 10, 2009
This behavior, where teens in many cases aren't even aware that cut-and-pasting school large pieces of school assignments is wrong is discussed in "The Cheating Culture" [http://www.cheati...ure.com/] Recommended and frightening.
eric_in_chicago
not rated yet Sep 10, 2009
Perhaps they just have crappy teachers that don't know how to teach writing and research skills.

Uh, if they put their cut-and-paste in quotes and list the URLs as references, then they wouldn't be plagiarizing.

But they would have to have been taught how to write a paper in the first place in order to know this...
Birthmark
not rated yet Sep 10, 2009
I LOVE technology, and the future, and I love using technology, but I don't let it interfere with my everyday life, nor do I take it for granted.

Ever since I had a phone (and I texted a lot!) I used correct grammar, I don't know what my motivation was, but at least I had it XD
getgoa
1 / 5 (1) Sep 11, 2009
Technology must be the wicked invention located here?---The Lord shall send upon thee famine and hunger, and a rebuke upon all the works which thou shalt do: until he consume and destroy thee quickly, for thy most wicked inventions, by which thou hast forsaken me. Deutoronomy Chapter 28 verse 20 Douay-Rheims bible. If I am reading between lines correctly of this article and the biblical sayings of Deutoronomy and Esdras(chpater4) written account of Artaxerxes from Persia is that war will repeat soon?