Engineering researchers: Novo-G supercomputer fastest of its type in world

Jul 23, 2009 by Aaron Hoover

A supercomputer named Novo-G described by its lead designer as likely the most powerful computer of its kind in the world became operational this week at the University of Florida.

Novo-G gets the first part of its name from the Latin term for "make anew, change, alter," and the second from "G" for "genesis." A "reconfigurable" computer, it can rearrange its internal circuitry to suit the task at hand. Applications range from space satellites to research supercomputers — anywhere size, energy and high speed are important, said Alan George, professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of UF's National Science Foundation Center for High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing.

Traditional computers use so-called "fixed logic devices" to perform a large variety of tasks. But this jack-of-all-trades approach requires a substantial amount of overhead in space and energy, no matter what work needs to be done. On the other hand, special-purpose computers can be built to perform certain tasks very well but are not flexible.

Reconfigurable computers make the best of both worlds, George said. That is because they can rearrange their internal circuitry like Lego blocks, creating the most appropriate architecture for each assignment. As a result, a reconfigurable computer can be from 10 to 100 times faster than other computers its size while using five to 10 times less energy.

Although the concept has been proven, reconfigurable computers remain at the research stage and are not easy to use. One of the main goals of the NSF Center is to pioneer techniques to make reconfigurable computers more accessible.

"It is very powerful technology, but it is also very complicated technology," George said. "We don't want this important technology to be accessible only to experts."

Source: University of Florida (news : web)

Explore further: Ride-sharing could cut cabs' road time by 30 percent

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Stackable computers out of this world

Jun 20, 2005

Brisbane engineers have teamed up with NASA to help build a new computer system for future space missions to the Moon, Mars and beyond. The team of electronics engineers from The University of Queensland, led ...

Space Robot Can Autonomously Reconfigure Itself

Jun 15, 2009

A robot designed to work in space should ideally be a Jack of all trades, with the ability to perform a wide variety of tasks by itself. By having one robot that can handle many jobs, astronauts can cut down ...

Research could produce a new class of computer chip

Feb 14, 2007

A new research project at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is aimed at developing an entirely new type of reconfigurable computing device, one that combines the speed and power efficiency of custom-designed chips with ...

Soft hardware for a flexible chip

Apr 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Technology is struggling to meet demands for high-performance, specialised computing systems. A European consortium is responding with a new kind of reconfigurable chip that is both efficient and flexible.

Engineers building first space supercomputer

Oct 26, 2006

HAL may soon be getting some company. But unlike the famous computer companion in Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” the first space-based supercomputer — so described because it will be by far the most powerful ...

2 qubits in action, new step towards the quantum computer

Jun 14, 2007

Researchers at Delft University of Technology have succeeded in carrying out calculations with two quantum bits, the building blocks of a possible future quantum computer. The Delft researchers are publishing ...

Recommended for you

Ride-sharing could cut cabs' road time by 30 percent

5 hours ago

Cellphone apps that find users car rides in real time are exploding in popularity: The car-service company Uber was recently valued at $18 billion, and even as it faces legal wrangles, a number of companies ...

Avatars make the Internet sign to deaf people

Aug 29, 2014

It is challenging for deaf people to learn a sound-based language, since they are physically not able to hear those sounds. Hence, most of them struggle with written language as well as with text reading ...

Chameleon: Cloud computing for computer science

Aug 26, 2014

Cloud computing has changed the way we work, the way we communicate online, even the way we relax at night with a movie. But even as "the cloud" starts to cross over into popular parlance, the full potential ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

joekid
not rated yet Jul 23, 2009
novo-g article is non-news how fast would be a start. Who hires your writers?
fmfbrestel
4 / 5 (1) Jul 24, 2009
No one. physorg does not write these. Physorg allows others to post their stories. This article was written by the university of florida.
nuge
not rated yet Jul 24, 2009
Try asking it "what is the meaning of life, the universe and everything?".