When climate is iffy, birds sing a more elaborate tune

May 21, 2009

Why is it that some birds sing such elaborate songs and others not so much? A new study published online on May 21st in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, says that climate patterns might be part of the answer.

The researchers show that difference in patterns among the many species of mockingbird vary with climate in the diverse places they live. Specifically, species that are subject to more variable and unpredictable climates also have more impressive singing skills.

"Local climatic patterns are great indicators of how demanding life can be at a certain site," said Carlos Botero of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. "For example, harsher winters, drier dry seasons, or highly unpredictable weather patterns make it harder for animals to survive and reproduce. Our data show that mockingbirds living in more demanding environments tend to have more elaborate song displays. We think that this surprising relationship reflects the fact that just as climatic patterns tell a lot about a site, singing behavior also tells a lot about a singer."

Male songbirds sing to attract mates and to repel , he explained. As a result, their songs are packed with information about their own quality and condition. Indeed, mockingbird males must learn the songs they sing, either inventing or copying various song elements. Differences in the quality of those songs can therefore reveal something about an individual male's brain power.

When the climate is less certain, those songs probably become even more critical as females become choosier in their mate selection, Botero added. After all, the reproductive consequences of choosing a "less-than-the-best-available partner" can be quite severe when times are tough. Under those circumstances, song displays will tend to become more elaborate over evolutionary time as males work harder to attract and convince a mate. A similar argument could be made for signals used in the context of male-male competition, Botero said.

And there could be other forces at play, he said. In environments with variable and unpredictable climates, natural selection for enhanced learning and innovation may lead to the evolution of signals of intelligence in the context of mate-attraction.

Botero says the findings in mockingbirds might even tell us something about ourselves.

Others have suggested that human displays, such as language, the arts, and music, might have evolved as signals of intelligence through the process of sexual selection, he said. "Our data suggest that a similar process might be going on in the songbirds, and this possibility presents us with a unique opportunity to understand the forces behind the evolution of traits that are so important for our own species."

Source: Cell Press (news : web)

Explore further: Lemurs match scent of a friend to sound of her voice

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Female birds boost up their eggs when hearing sexy song

Jun 08, 2006

In a new study published in the latest issue of Ethology researchers show that female songbirds can alter the size of eggs and possibly the sex of their chicks according to how they perceive their mate’s quality.

Female birds 'jam' their mates' flirtatious songs

Mar 12, 2009

When a single female is nearby, female antbirds will sing over the songs of their male partners in an apparent attempt to keep their messages from getting through, according to a new report published online on March 12th ...

For crickets, parasitic flies can stop the music

Dec 13, 2006

Love hurts — really bad, for some unlucky crickets, anyway. Male crickets draw not only females with their songs but also parasitic flies. The uninvited guests then deposit larvae that burrow into their amorous hosts, grow ...

Female Birds Boost Up Their Eggs When Hearing Sexy Song

Jul 17, 2006

In a new study published in the latest issue of Ethology researchers show that female songbirds can alter the size of eggs and possibly the sex of their chicks according to how they perceive their mate's quality. The resear ...

Recommended for you

Lemurs match scent of a friend to sound of her voice

12 hours ago

Humans aren't alone in their ability to match a voice to a face—animals such as dogs, horses, crows and monkeys are able to recognize familiar individuals this way too, a growing body of research shows.

Love-shy panda artificially inseminated

21 hours ago

Britain's only female giant panda, Tian Tian, has been artificially inseminated after failing to mate with her male partner Yang Guang, Edinburgh Zoo said Tuesday.

User comments : 0

More news stories

ESO image: A study in scarlet

This new image from ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that ...

First direct observations of excitons in motion achieved

A quasiparticle called an exciton—responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits—has been understood theoretically for decades. But exciton movement within ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Warm US West, cold East: A 4,000-year pattern

Last winter's curvy jet stream pattern brought mild temperatures to western North America and harsh cold to the East. A University of Utah-led study shows that pattern became more pronounced 4,000 years ago, ...