$14M effort announced to save rare Hawaiian bird

Apr 19, 2009
FILE- In this Tuesday, June 19, 2001 file photo, a baby alala, receives its first meal of bee larvae and cricket parts at the Maui Bird Conservation Center, in Maui, Hawaii. Federal wildlife officials have a revised recovery plan for the endangered Hawaiian crow, which is only found in captivity on the Big Island and is one of the rarest forest birds in the world. (AP Photo/Zoological Society of San Diego)

(AP) -- Federal wildlife officials say they plan to spend more than $14 million to prevent the extinction of the Hawaiian crow, one of the rarest forest birds in the world.

The endangered bird, known as the alala, is only found in captivity on the Big Island.

Two bird conservation centers are home to 56 alala. The bird hasn't been seen in the wild since 2002.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says its five-year plan to restore alala populations includes protection of habitats and management of threats to the species.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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