Transplanted coral growing fast in lagoon off Okinawa coast

Feb 07, 2009 The Yomiuri Shimbun

Baby coral transplanted in the Sekisei coral-reef lagoon in Japan's Okinawa Prefecture under a coral-reef regeneration program are growing steadily, according to the Environment Ministry and the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology.

The Sekisei Lagoon, which extends between the Ishigakijima and Iriomotejima islands, is located about 450 kilometers west of the prefecture's main island and is the country's largest coral reef.

The lagoon area also includes the smaller islands of Taketomijima and Kuroshima.

Researchers working on the joint project first implant fertilized coral eggs into ceramic beds. Once the eggs have grown into larvae 1 centimeter to 2 centimeters in diameter, they remove the ceramic beds and attach them to rocks in the seabed.

Since the project began in fiscal year 2004, about 7,500 baby coral have been transplanted. In some areas, scientists have found staghorn coral of about 10 centimeters in height where they planted baby coral last year.

Recent mass generation of Acanthaster starfish and coral bleaching in the area have caused catastrophic damage to the Sekisei Lagoon. Because of the damage, the reef has diminished to about 20 percent of its largest recorded size.

___

(c) 2009, The Yomiuri Shimbun.
Visit the Daily Yomiuri Online at www.yomiuri.co.jp/index-e.htm/
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Explore further: Satellite data measures Nile water for region security

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Comet ISON's dramatic final hours

59 minutes ago

(Phys.org) —A new analysis of data from the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft has revealed that comet 2012/S1 (ISON) stopped producing dust and gas shortly before it raced past ...

Company gets new name after protests by Hawaiians

2 hours ago

(AP)—A company aiming to provide easier access to sexually transmitted disease test results and other medical records has found a new name after facing protests by Native Hawaiians for using the word hula.

Fair cake cutting gets its own algorithm

2 hours ago

The next time your children quibble about who gets to eat which part of a cake, call in some experts on the art of sharing. Mathematician Julius Barbanel of Union College, and political scientist Steven Brams of New York ...

Recommended for you

Studying wetlands as a producer of greenhouse gases

5 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Wetlands are well known for their beneficial role in the environment. But UConn Honors student Emily McInerney '15 (CAHNR) is studying a less widely known role of wetlands – as a major producer ...

User comments : 0