Nanoscale carbon materials research wins the 2008 Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics

Oct 01, 2008

Dr. Phaedon Avouris of IBM and Professor Tony Heinz of Columbia University were presented with the 2008 Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics on 27 September 2008 during a day-long forum at Harvard University, attended by luminaries of the field. The Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics recognizes researchers who have made an outstanding and innovative contribution to the field of applied physics. The forum was sponsored by the scientific publisher Springer.

Avouris and Heinz were honored for their pioneering work on the electrical and optical properties of nanoscale carbon materials. Carbon nanotubes, first reported in 1991, and graphene, which was even more recently discovered in 2004, have attracted a vibrant community of researchers intent on characterizing these new materials.

Carbon nanotubes and graphene show promise for a number of applications. One of the most exciting possibilities is that these materials could integrate electronics and optics, which could allow light to replace electricity in computers. This would allow faster calculations (since light moves far faster than electrons) and would eradicate some of today's problems with electronics, including chip-to-chip bottlenecks.

Heinz said, "This new set of materials is completely different from the materials that form the basis for today's computers and communications technologies. This is a very exciting time to explore the fundamental properties of these materials." His co-winner agreed: "We are looking at electronics after silicon," said Avouris. "Wouldn't it be nice to unify electronics and optics with a single material?"

Heinz continued, "It is extremely important that ideas in one subfield enhance other fields. That's encouraged by having a broad set of talks, like we had here today at the forum."

Other potential applications include photovoltaics, sensors and light emitters, and uses in medicine. The current, work, however, is science research. Specific applications are difficult to foresee at this stage.

Avouris added, "The main motivator for research is always curiosity."

Phaedon Avouris is an IBM Fellow and manager of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology at IBM's Research Division at the Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY.

Tony Heinz is the David M. Rickey Professor in the Departments of Physics and Electrical Engineering at Columbia University. Previously, he also worked at IBM's Research Division at the Watson Research Center.

The Springer Forum

For the past 10 years, the Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics has been awarded by the editors-in-chief of the Springer journals Applied Physics A-Materials Science & Processing (Dr. Michael Stuke, MPI Goettingen) and Applied Physics B-Lasers and Optics (Dr. Frank Traeger, University of Kassel). The winners receive the prize and checks totaling $5000.

This year the prize was awarded during the first Julius Springer Forum on Applied Physics at Harvard University, at which leading scientists in the field of applied physics were brought together for a day of talks and poster presentations. The Springer Forum was organized by the editors-in-chief of Applied Physics A and Applied Physics B.

In addition to the prize winners of the Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics, speakers included Nobel Laureate Wolfgang Ketterle of MIT and Stefan Hell of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry. The invited presentations at the Springer Forum, by distinguished researchers from both industry and academia in fields ranging from atomic physics, condensed matter physics and nanotechnology to chemistry and biotechnology, allowed ideas to cross-percolate.

Source: Springer

Explore further: Thinnest feasible nano-membrane produced

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Why are action stars more likely to be Republican?

Apr 10, 2012

Fighting ability, largely determined by upper body strength, continues to rule the minds of modern men, according to a new study by Aaron Sell from Griffith University in Australia and colleagues. Their work explores the ...

The indiscretions of a champagne bubble paparazzi

Feb 14, 2012

The innermost secrets of champagne bubbles are about to be unveiled in the Springer journal European Physical Journal ST. This fascinating work is the brainchild of Gérard Liger-Belair, a scientist tackli ...

Recommended for you

Thinnest feasible nano-membrane produced

Apr 17, 2014

A new nano-membrane made out of the 'super material' graphene is extremely light and breathable. Not only can this open the door to a new generation of functional waterproof clothing, but also to ultra-rapid filtration. The ...

Wiring up carbon-based electronics

Apr 17, 2014

Carbon-based nanostructures such as nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanoribbons are unique building blocks showing versatile nanomechanical and nanoelectronic properties. These materials which are ordered ...

Making 'bucky-balls' in spin-out's sights

Apr 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —A new Oxford spin-out firm is targeting the difficult challenge of manufacturing fullerenes, known as 'bucky-balls' because of their spherical shape, a type of carbon nanomaterial which, like ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Easter morning delivery for space station

Space station astronauts got a special Easter treat: a cargo ship full of supplies. The shipment arrived Sunday morning via the SpaceX company's Dragon cargo capsule.

Hackers of Oman news agency target Bouteflika

Hackers on Sunday targeted the website of Oman's official news agency, singling out and mocking Algeria's newly re-elected president Abdelaziz Bouteflika as a handicapped "dictator".