Campus green spaces enhance quality of life

Sep 29, 2008

The next time you see students playing an energized game of touch football or studying in the sunshine on a college quadrangle, consider this: campus green spaces can help students feel better about life and improve learning.

Trying to determine the relationship between availability and access to green spaces and students' quality of life, researchers at Texas State University recently surveyed 373 undergraduates at the San Marcos campus. Results of the survey were published in the April 2008 issue of the American Society for Horticultural Science's journal, HortTechnology.

Depending on their answers to survey questions, respondents were ranked as "low users", "medium users", or "high users" of campus green spaces. More than 90 percent of respondents were ranked as either high or medium users of green space. Students were also asked to rate their perception of quality of life. A mean score of more than four (on a scale of 1 to 5) indicated that most students rated their quality of life as positive.

According to A.L. McFarland, a graduate student in the Department of Agriculture at TSU and primary author of the study, the researchers were able to make a "statistically significant" correlation between green space users and those who gave a high rating to their quality of life. "These findings indicated that those (students) who used campus green spaces more frequently rated their overall quality of life higher when compared with students who used the campus green spaces and arboretum less frequently", said McFarland.

Higher quality of life wasn't the only bonus for green space users. "High users" of campus green spaces also rated their cognitive ability to apply knowledge learned in college as higher when compared to those students who spent less time in green spaces. It appears that going green is not just for the environment anymore, so, students—get outside and get happy!

Source: American Society for Horticultural Science

Explore further: Study shows more than half of peer-reviewed research articles published during 2007-2012 are now open access

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Campus showcases high-performance buildings

Jul 01, 2014

Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are transforming the way the world uses energy—and those transformations become apparent the moment one sets foot on the NREL campus in ...

New metamaterial gives light a one-way ticket

Jul 01, 2014

The light-warping structures known as metamaterials have a new trick in their ever-expanding repertoire. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built a silver, glass ...

Trapping the light fantastic

Jun 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —The development of a 'nanobarrel' that traps and concentrates light onto single molecules could be used as a low-cost and reliable diagnostic test.

Recommended for you

Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

Oct 21, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

How the lotus got its own administration

Oct 21, 2014

Actually the lotus is a very ordinary plant. Nevertheless, during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) a complex bureaucratic structure was built up around this plant. The lotus was part of the Imperial Household, ...

What labels on textiles can tell us about society

Oct 21, 2014

Throughout Chinese history, dynastic states used labels on textiles to spread information on the maker, the commissioner, the owner or the date and site of production. Silks produced in state-owned manufacture ...

User comments : 0