Hurricane Hanna Not Moving Much Near North of the Caicos Islands

Sep 01, 2008
Credit: NASA/JPL

Tropical Storm Hanna has virtually parked herself north of the Caicos Islands in the Atlantic Ocean, continuing to bring residents heavy rains and winds. A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the central and southeastern Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos islands.

This visible image of Hanna was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. It was created on August 31 at 18:11 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT).

At 8:00 a.m. EDT the center of Tropical Storm Hanna had maximum sustained winds near 50 mph. She was located near latitude 23.6 north and longitude 72.4 west or about 90 miles north-northeast of the southeastern Bahamas. She's been nearly stationary, drifting westward near 2 mph and will continue that way for the next day or two. On the forecast track the center of Hanna will move near or over the southeastern Bahamas during the next day or two. The estimated minimum central pressure is 996 millibars.

Rainfall expected through Thursday over the central and Southeastern Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos islands will be between 4 to 8 inches with maximum amounts near 12 inches. In addition, ocean swells are expected to increase the risk of dangerous rip currents along portions of the southeastern United States coast during the next couple of days.

Source: by Rob Gutro/Goddard Space Flight Center

Explore further: NASA provides double vision on Typhoon Matmo

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Apple's fiscal 3Q earnings top analyst forecasts

8 hours ago

Apple's growth prospects are looking brighter as anticipation builds for the upcoming release of the next iPhone, a model that is expected to cater to consumers yearning for a bigger screen.

Recommended for you

Fires in the Northern Territories July 2014

10 hours ago

Environment Canada has issued a high health risk warning for Yellowknife and surrounding area because of heavy smoke in the region due to forest fires. In the image taken by the Aqua satellite, the smoke ...

How much magma is hiding beneath our feet?

11 hours ago

Molten rock (or magma) has a strong influence on our planet and its inhabitants, causing destructive volcanic eruptions and generating some of the giant mineral deposits. Our understanding of these phenomena ...

Oso disaster had its roots in earlier landslides

13 hours ago

The disastrous March 22 landslide that killed 43 people in the rural Washington state community of Oso involved the "remobilization" of a 2006 landslide on the same hillside, a new federally sponsored geological study concludes.

User comments : 0