Physicists 'See' Single Top Quarks at the Tevatron

Aug 22, 2008 By Laura Mgrdichian feature

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists at the world's largest fully operating particle accelerator, the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, have discovered convincing evidence suggesting the existence of top quarks that are not coupled to their antiparticle, the antitop. These "single" top quarks have been hunted since Fermilab scientists first discovered top-antitop pairs in 1995.

The results, published in a recent edition of Physical Review D, affirm and improve upon preliminary data published last year in Physical Review Letters, which pointed to the production of single top quarks but were not precise enough to claim true discovery.

Fermilab physicists hope that the techniques they used to find the single top quark could help them in their search for the proposed Higgs boson, a particle that exists so far only in theory but if actually found would have a huge impact on physics. The Higgs is expected to reveal such basic information as why nature assigned certain masses to certain particles—the origin of mass, essentially.

The results are the product of a long period of analysis by Fermilab's D0 ("D-Zero") collaboration, an international group of physicists from 90 institutions. The group studies data from particle collisions that occur within the D0 particle detector; in this case, data generated by collisions between a beam of protons and a beam of antiprotons. D0 is a building-sized cylindrical device that surrounds the collision site, measuring and recording the energies and trajectories of the many, many particles produced when the beams are smashed together.

Isolating one signal of interest out of the massive amounts of data collected by the D0 detector, the "signature" of a certain particle or event, is an extremely difficult task.

“I would say that the single top is the most subtle signal that we have been able to successfully extract from our data," said D0 co-spokesperson Darien Wood, of Northeastern University, to PhysOrg.com. "In the end, the signal is based on only a few events, but it is not particular events that you can point to. Instead, it is a subtle statistical difference in the population of events that tells you that the single top is in the mix."

He clarified, "For example, I could say that the population of Danes is on average slightly taller than the population of Norwegians. But I cannot say that if I randomly pick one Dane and one Norwegian, the Dane will be taller. Nor can I look at someone's height and determine whether that person is Danish or Norwegian.

"If, however, I had a sample with an unknown mix of Danes and Norwegians, I could estimate the fraction of Danes knowing only their heights."

Using this premise, and some very sophisticated analysis techniques, D0 physicists first narrowed down a million billion proton-antiproton collisions worth of data to about 1,400 events that may have produced a single top quark. From there, they determined that 60 of these were single-top events.

The co-leader of the team who performed the analysis, Ann Heinson from the University of California, Riverside, told PhysOrg.com, "These 60 events differed only in the tiniest details from the rest of the sample of 1,400 events. We had to use three independent methods to combine multiple measurements of different properties of the events to be able to distinguish the signal events from the background ones. We then combined the three results for maximum sensitivity.

"These three discrimination methods had not been used in a search before. The graduate students and postdocs who did the analyses really broke a lot of new ground."

Single top quarks, as well as the Higgs, are predicted by the "Standard Model" of particle physics, the broad theory that describes elementary particles, three fundamental physics forces—strong, weak, and electromagnetic—and the relationships between them.

At very high energies, like those produced in accelerators, the weak and electromagnetic forces are often thought of as two aspects of the same force, and are therefore sometimes collectively referred to as the electroweak interaction. The Standard Model states that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with either a "down" antiquark, a "strange" antiquark, or (the vast majority of the time) a "bottom" antiquark.

This is unlike strong-force interactions, in which the top quark is always produced with a top antiquark. It was from these interactions that physicists from both of Fermilab's main experiments, D0 and CDF, were able to first discover the top quark in top-antitop pairs.

Citation: Physical Review D 78, 012005 (2008)

Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com.
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.

Explore further: Researchers find first direct evidence of 'spin symmetry' in atoms

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Designing exascale computers

Jul 23, 2014

"Imagine a heart surgeon operating to repair a blocked coronary artery. Someday soon, the surgeon might run a detailed computer simulation of blood flowing through the patient's arteries, showing how millions ...

How does your garden grow?

Jul 01, 2014

Growing plants in a microscope is helping scientists to view roots developing in 3D and in real time. "With the growth conditions under our control, we can explore how roots respond to different environmental ...

Viewer interface for TV layers Web content for context

Mar 08, 2014

(Phys.org) —In past years, the television was less fondly called the idiot box. Today the TV is more fondly being promoted as a potential informationalized box, signified by technology offered by a new ...

Recommended for you

What is Nothing?

12 hours ago

Is there any place in the Universe where there's truly nothing? Consider the gaps between stars and galaxies? Or the gaps between atoms? What are the properties of nothing?

On the hunt for dark matter

15 hours ago

New University of Adelaide Future Fellow Dr Martin White is starting a research project that has the potential to redirect the experiments of thousands of physicists around the world who are trying to identify the nature ...

Water window imaging opportunity

Aug 21, 2014

Ever heard of the water window? It consists of radiations in the 3.3 to 4.4 nanometre range, which are not absorbed by the water in biological tissues. New theoretical findings show that it is possible to ...

User comments : 9

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Modernmystic
2.3 / 5 (9) Aug 22, 2008
neener neener LHC.....here's hoping they find the Higgs before they flip the switch across the pond. :)
ZeroDelta
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 22, 2008
I thought they meant a lone quark. I was blown away for a moment.
googleplex
2.5 / 5 (4) Aug 22, 2008
Yes the headline is attention grabbing. It should read:
Physicists 'See' Evidence of Single Top Quarks at the Tevatron
Zero
4 / 5 (2) Aug 22, 2008
Well you never really 'see' any particles that are created, unless they are leptons, photons, or jets. Although I gotta say this should have been expected prior to the discovery of the Higgs. Seeing how the Higgs is usually created and decays via top-quark loops. I suppose another million billion events and we will have the Higgs :)
johanfprins
1.3 / 5 (7) Aug 23, 2008
There are lies, damn lies and statistics?
GoodElf
1 / 5 (2) Aug 24, 2008
Could it be that this "property", because it is a statistically shared one, could mean that "many" top quarks behave with an individually small proportion of singular behavior (partial decoupling) rather than all top quarks having the possibility to act/react entirely as "free quarks" entirely decoupled from other quarks?
Zero
5 / 5 (1) Aug 24, 2008
...all your questions should be answered in

http://arxiv.org/...39v2.pdf

a standard HEP publication :) 51 pages long!
kniedzius
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 25, 2008
Go Tevatron! Rub it in the LHC's face!
I'm quite amazed that everything goes so smoothly with the research of Higgs boson.
lengould100
1 / 5 (1) Sep 09, 2008
Oh well.... I guess competition among accelerator crews might actually be healthy, in some ways. Using it for your personal brand of nationalism however, cannot in any way be healthy.