Yale Professor wins Godel Prize for showing how computer algorithms solve problems

Aug 13, 2008
Daniel Spielman Presenting Gödel Prize Lecture
Daniel Spielman presenting Gödel Prize lecture. Photo: Donna Marland

Daniel A. Spielman, professor of applied mathematics and computer science at Yale, has been awarded the prestigious Gödel Prize for developing a technique, known as Smoothed Analysis, that helps predict the success of problem-solving with real data and computers. He shared the prize with Shang-Hua Teng, professor of computer science at Boston University.

The award, carrying a $5,000 honorarium, recognizes outstanding papers in theoretical computer science. It was presented to Spielman and Teng by the Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computing Theory (SIGACT) of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (EATCS) at the International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP) in Reykjavik, Iceland.

According to the association, this rigorous mathematical analysis provided a giant leap forward for predicting the performance of optimization tools for real data. Understanding the mathematical structure of these problems is necessary for the design of efficient protocols and software. The paper by Spielman and Teng, "Smoothed Analysis of Algorithms: Why the Simplex Algorithm Usually Takes Polynomial Time," was published in the Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery in 2004.

Spielman, a member of the Yale faculty since 2005, previously taught at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), after completing his postdoctoral work in mathematical sciences at the University of California Berkeley and his PhD at MIT. He graduated summa cum laude with exceptional distinction in computer science from Yale.

Spielman was previously honored with a National Science Foundation Career Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, and his work on Smoothed Analysis was cited by the National Science Foundation as one of three significant accomplishments funded by the computer science division of the NSF in 2003. He also received the celebrated 2002 Information Theory Society Paper Award given by the IEEE Information Theory Society.

Source: Yale University

Explore further: Computer scientists can predict the price of Bitcoin

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What studying networks can tell us about the world

Feb 12, 2014

There was an opening ceremony on Feb. 5 for the Yale Institute for Network Science (YINS), dedicated to exploring fundamental properties of networks as they appear throughout the biological, physical, and ...

Indian researcher helps prove math conjecture from the 1950s

Jul 17, 2013

On June 18, Adam Marcus and Daniel A. Spielman of Yale University, along with Nikhil Srivastava of Microsoft Research India, announced a proof of the Kadison-Singer conjecture, a question about the mathematical foundations ...

Fundamental algorithm gets first improvement in 10 years

Sep 27, 2010

The maximum-flow problem, or max flow, is one of the most basic problems in computer science: First solved during preparations for the Berlin airlift, it’s a component of many logistical problems and a staple ...

Recommended for you

Oculus Rift users to see Moon live through robot

21 minutes ago

A group from Carnegie Mellon wants to send a robot to the Moon to beam live pictures of the Moon to Oculus Rift headset users, reported technology reporter Jane Wakefield of the BBC. Andy the robot is intended ...

A blue Christmas for Amazon?

25 minutes ago

It might be a blue Christmas for Amazon. The world's largest retailer gave a disappointing forecast for the crucial holiday quarter. The company also reported a wider loss than analysts expected for the third ...

US tech firm fined for underpaying Indian workers

2 hours ago

A Silicon Valley company is paying more than $43,000 in back wages and penalties after labor regulators found eight employees brought from India were grossly underpaid and overworked while assigned to a special project in ...

Facebook goes retro with 'Rooms' chat app

2 hours ago

Facebook on Thursday released an application that lets people create virtual "rooms" to chat about whatever they wish using any name they would like.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

superhuman
5 / 5 (1) Aug 13, 2008
I know what he will spend the money on - a laser pointer.