'Super paper:' New nanopaper more break-resistant than cast iron

Jun 09, 2008
Nanopaper
Scientists report development of cellulose nanopaper, a superstrong material that could be used in the construction industry. Above is a cross-section of a fracture surface of a cellulose nanofibril film. Credit: Courtesy of American Chemical Society

Researchers in Sweden and Japan report development of a new type of paper that resists breaking when pulled almost as well as cast iron. The new material, called "cellulose nanopaper," is made of sub-microscopic particles of cellulose and may open the way for expanded use of paper as a construction material and in other applications, they suggest. Their study is scheduled for the June 9 issue of ACS' Biomacromolecules.

In the new study, Lars A. Berglund and colleagues note that cellulose — a tough, widely available substance obtained from plants — has potential as a strong, lightweight ingredient in composites and other materials in a wide range of products.

Although cellulose-based composites have high strength, existing materials are brittle and snap easily when pulled.

The study described a solution to this problem. It involves exposing wood pulp to certain chemicals to produce cellulose nanopaper. Their study found that its tensile strength — a material's ability to resist pull before snapping — exceeded that of cast iron.

They also were able to adjust the paper's strength by changing its internal structure.

Source: ACS

Explore further: Transformations on carbon surfaces under the influence of metal nanoparticles and microwaves

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User comments : 8

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zevkirsh
4.5 / 5 (2) Jun 09, 2008
i read about this before , and i somehow could see this as the revival of some ancient recipe for paper that ancient warriors used as for armor.
it almost sounds like such a simple technique that an alchemist could have simply found it many hudnreds of years ago and been forgotten. go chemists!
Mercury_01
3 / 5 (1) Jun 09, 2008
yeah, but can you make roat beef hash on it?
Glis
4 / 5 (1) Jun 09, 2008
But what about tearing? Serious question. Does tensile strength really mean anything if it still tears like paper?
SongDog
3 / 5 (1) Jun 09, 2008
Original article is at pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/sample.cgi/bomaf6/2008/9/i06/pdf/bm800038n.pdf
superhuman
2 / 5 (2) Jun 09, 2008
Why is this a 'nano' paper?
NeilFarbstein
1.3 / 5 (4) Jun 09, 2008
That's nothing we vulvox is working on a nanopaper that's 100 times stronger than steel.
weewilly
4.3 / 5 (3) Jun 09, 2008
How will our shredders work now?
Glis
4 / 5 (2) Jun 09, 2008
That's nothing we vulvox is working on a nanopaper that's 100 times stronger than steel.


Doesn't vulvox send e-mails asking if you want to 'UPpGRADE yOu're P3n1s'?

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