Wild Sky Wilderness bill approved in House

May 01, 2008

The U.S. House approved a bill creating the Wild Sky Wilderness in Washington state, officials said Wednesday.

The legislation, which will preserve more than 106,000 acres of wilderness in Snohomish County in the front range of the Cascade Mountains, was approved by the House Tuesday 291-117. The measure now goes to President George Bush, who is expected to sign it into law, said U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash.

"We've reached the end of a long hike. There have been many twists and turns along the way, and let me tell you -- it's a beautiful view from here," said Larsen.

The bill was led through the Senate by Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash.

The lawmakers said Wild Sky protects thousands of acres of low-elevation old growth and 25 miles of salmon streams to make the land accessible for recreational use.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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