Tests reveal first cancer victim in Norway

Apr 27, 2008

DNA and X-ray tests of two bodies dated back to the year 834 have revealed the first case of cancer in the history of Norway, researchers say.

University of Oslo Anatomy Professor Per Holck said tests of the two female bodies found buried in the Oseberg, a Viking ship found in Norway in the early 1900s, showed one of the women had cancerous tumors in her bones, Aftenposten reported Saturday.

"We see here the first known case of cancer in this country," Holck said.

Holck said the cancer could have been breast or uterine cancer and appeared to have spread to the point where the woman had little chance to live.

"Even today she would have had little chance of recovery," he said.

The tests on the bodies also indicated the women were likely stronger than modern women and that both lived hard lives.

Aftenposten said the tests' results also offered contradictory evidence to a previous claim that one of the women was likely the paternal grandmother of Norway's first king, Harald Harfagre.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Experts examine bones as Spain hunts for Cervantes' remains (Update)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Gullies on Vesta suggest past water-mobilized flows

22 minutes ago

(Phys.org)—Protoplanet Vesta, visited by NASA's Dawn spacecraft from 2011 to 2013, was once thought to be completely dry, incapable of retaining water because of the low temperatures and pressures at its ...

Invention slows water evaporation, generates energy

32 minutes ago

A new technology invented at the University of Arizona offers a positive environmental impact by slowing the evaporation of water from bodies of water such as mining tailings ponds and reservoirs, while simultaneously ...

Geologists solve mystery of Tibetan mountains

34 minutes ago

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, University of Kansas geologists have unraveled one of the geologic mysteries of Tibet. The research, recently published online in Nature Geoscience, shows that i ...

Nanotechnology changes behavior of materials

2 minutes ago

One of the reasons solar cells are not used more widely is cost—the materials used to make them most efficient are expensive. Engineers are exploring ways to print solar cells from inks, but the devices ...

'Predicted' zeolites may fuel efficient processes

12 minutes ago

(Phys.org)—Scientists at Rice University and the University of Minnesota have identified synthetic materials that may purify ethanol more efficiently and greatly improve the separation of long-chain hydrocarbons ...

Recommended for you

Kennewick Man's DNA likely that of a Native

Jan 20, 2015

Nearly two decades after the ancient skeleton called Kennewick Man was discovered on the banks of the Columbia River, the mystery of his origins appears to be nearing resolution.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

DeeSmith
not rated yet Apr 27, 2008
Tsk Tsk.

Primary tuberculosis of bone mimicking a lytic bone tumor. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2007 Mar;29(3):198-202.

It wouldn't be the first time that archeological medical diagnosis of bone cancer was confused with skeletal TB. It would be MUCH more probable as a diagnosis in this time period, in Norway.
mark00
not rated yet Mar 01, 2009
the article tells of the two women being from the 1900s. Yet the title states they were of year 834? which is it?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.