LG.Philips LCD BEGINS SHIPPING 37-INCH WIDE FORMAT TFT-LCDs FOR HDTVs

Sep 23, 2004

LG.Philips LCD Co., Ltd., one of the world’s leading manufacturers of thin-film-transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) technology, today announced that it has begun volume production and shipment of its latest TFT-LCD panel for TV applications—the LC370W01, a 37-inch wide display. In addition, the company expects to begin shipping the LC320W01, a 32-inch wide display for TV applications, within a month. These displays will ship to some of today’s leading television manufacturers for incorporation into new, sleek and flat HDTVs.

Both the 32- and 37-inch wide displays feature LG.Philips LCD’s Super-In-Plane Switching (S-IPS) technology, for wider viewing angle and higher color fidelity by minimizing color and gamma shift. In addition, both displays have a quick response time of 8 ms, resolution of 1366 x 768, brightness of 500 cd/m2 and a contrast ratio of 550:1.


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