Great Lakes compact languishes

Apr 07, 2008

Michigan, Wisconsin and Ohio are holding up work by lawmakers in six states on a compact covering Great Lakes water, environmentalists say.

Supporters of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact in Wisconsin and Ohio are worried that the Great Lakes could see forced water diversions amid a drought, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported Sunday.

The newspaper said Northeast Ohio could be affected given its dependence on Lake Erie, the shallowest of the five Great Lakes.

"And given our heavy reliance on Lake Erie water for industry, drinking water and recreation, Ohio may have more at stake than any other state over how the entire Great Lakes basin's water supply is managed," said Trent Dougherty of the Ohio Environmental Council.

Wisconsin environmental groups say they are puzzled that the compact has foundered in the state capitol.

"What's most amazing is that the three states who are lagging the most behind are the ones with the most shoreline and the most to lose -- Michigan, Wisconsin and Ohio," said Jeffrey Potter, director of communications for the Wisconsin-based Biodiversity Project.

Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota and New York have signed the agreement and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec have approved it in principal, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Atmospheric mercury review raises concerns of environmental impact

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Precarious work schedules common among younger workers

33 minutes ago

One wish many workers may have this Labor Day is for more control and predictability of their work schedules. A new report finds that unpredictability is widespread in many workers' schedules—one reason ...

Top ten reptiles and amphibians benefitting from zoos

33 minutes ago

A frog that does not croak, the largest living lizard, and a tortoise that can live up to 100 years are just some of the species staving off extinction thanks to the help of zoos, according to a new report.

Changes in farming and climate hurting British moths

43 minutes ago

Britain's moths are feeling the pinch – threatened on one side by climate change and on the other by habitat loss and harmful farming methods. A new study gives the most comprehensive picture yet of trends ...

Recommended for you

New solutions needed to recycle fracking water

20 hours ago

Rice University scientists have produced a detailed analysis of water produced by hydraulic fracturing (aka fracking) of three gas reservoirs and suggested environmentally friendly remedies are needed to ...

Feds allows logging after huge California wildfire

Aug 28, 2014

The U.S. Forest Service has decided to allow logging on nearly 52 square miles of the Sierra Nevada burned last year in a massive California wildfire, a move contested by environmentalists.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Corban
not rated yet Apr 08, 2008
It's not amazing at all. It's another example of vested interests protecting territory. On the flipside, IN, IL, MN and NY could be seen as vamping off them. The question is what rights and obligations they expect.