$500,000 Dyke Marsh study begins

Mar 23, 2008

The National Park Service is starting a $500,000 probe to find ways to improve and maintain the Dyke Marsh in Alexandria, Va., it was reported Saturday.

The 485-acre wetlands, which house snakes, turtles, swans and many other species of wildlife, have been plagued with litter, The Washington Post reported.

The probe reportedly was approved by Congress last year as part of an attempt to stop erosion caused by human activity.

The impacts of fishing, boating, kayaking and other activities may be studied, the Post report said.

Almost 50 percent of the marsh was ruined in the 1960s by commercial digging and construction waste being unloaded into it.

"We have so little. We feel a responsibility to what is left," Friends of Dyke Marsh President Glenda C. Booth said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: MEPs back plans to slash use of plastic shopping bags

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers question emergency water treatment guidelines

13 hours ago

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) recommendations for treating water after a natural disaster or other emergencies call for more chlorine bleach than is necessary to kill disease-causing pathogens ...

European climate at the +2 C global warming threshold

15 hours ago

A global warming of 2 C relative to pre-industrial climate has been considered as a threshold which society should endeavor to remain below, in order to limit the dangerous effects of anthropogenic climate change.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Melting during cooling period

(Phys.org) —A University of Maine research team says stratification of the North Atlantic Ocean contributed to summer warming and glacial melting in Scotland during the period recognized for abrupt cooling ...