Microneedles Could Replace Syringe

Mar 10, 2008
Microneedles Could Replace Syringe
Side view of PVP polymer microneedles with sulforhodamine encapsulated within microneedles. Each microneedle measures 750 µm in height, 250 µm in base diameter, and 5 µm in tip radius. Credit: Advanced Materials, 2008.

The common needle phobia and painful injections could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to a revolutionary new drug-delivery technique developed by a team at the Georgia Institute of Technology, US. The long-practiced method of drug administration has up to now involved the use of hypodermic needles but they have many drawbacks, including pain, risk of infection, and the need for trained staff to perform the injection.

The very few non-invasive methods of drug delivery, such as the transdermal patch, best known in its role as the smokers' nicotine patch, are unsuitable for most drugs as only very small molecules can be transported across intact skin, which excludes the large biotherapeutic molecules found in many medicines.

But what if there was another way, one that was as safe and painless as a patch but as fast and effective as an injection? In a revolutionary new study published in this month's Advanced Materials, the researchers at Georgia Tech. have designed tiny "microneedles", only five micrometers wide at the tip, which can quickly and painlessly deliver drugs into the body and are as effective as a hypodermic.

The drug, in the form of biomolecules, is encapsulated within the microneedles, which are then inserted into the skin in the same way that nicotine is released into the bloodstream from a patch. The needles dissolve within minutes, releasing the trapped cargo at the intended delivery site. They do not need to be removed and no dangerous or biohazardous substance is left behind on the skin.

The researchers chose the mechanically strong polymer poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) to fabricate the microneedles because it is robust enough to pierce the skin, dissolves quickly, and is harmless to the body. The molding technique used to prepare the needles means that the rate at which they dissolve can be precisely tuned, depending on how much time is needed for them to travel through the body to the delivery site.

This innovative new treatment method means that vaccines, proteins, and hormones could soon be delivered into the body as effortlessly and painlessly as wearing a plaster. So could needle phobia soon be a thing of the past?

"We expect that microneedles will be able to replace hypodermic needles in some scenarios, but certainly not all cases," said Dr. Mark Prausnitz, who headed up the research. "They won't be useful for withdrawing significant quantities of blood for analysis, for example."

However, the team does expect that the microneedles will have important medical and biotechnology applications. "They are a useful way to deliver vaccines," explained Prausnitz. "Microneedles could possibly enable self-administration of the annual flu vaccine and a number of drugs, including insulin and growth hormone."

Article information: Advanced Materials, 2008, 20, 933; doi: 10.1002/adma.200701205

Source: by Sophie Ladden, Wiley

Explore further: Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New health scans provide data on ancient mummies

1 hour ago

A mummy rolled down hospital hallways here on Sunday. Amen-Nestawy-Nakht, a 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest, was getting a CAT scan at Barnes-Jewish. It was probably his second. The lastonewas a couple of decades ago, when ...

'Great wall of Jakarta' plan to combat floods

1 hour ago

Jakarta has launched a multi-billion-dollar scheme to build a huge sea wall to combat flooding as the Indonesian capital sinks, but there is scepticism about its chances of success in a country with a history ...

Recommended for you

Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms

Oct 18, 2014

Throw a rock through a window made of silica glass, and the brittle, insulating oxide pane shatters. But whack a golf ball with a club made of metallic glass—a resilient conductor that looks like metal—and the glass not ...

Superconducting circuits, simplified

Oct 17, 2014

Computer chips with superconducting circuits—circuits with zero electrical resistance—would be 50 to 100 times as energy-efficient as today's chips, an attractive trait given the increasing power consumption ...

Protons hog the momentum in neutron-rich nuclei

Oct 16, 2014

Like dancers swirling on the dance floor with bystanders looking on, protons and neutrons that have briefly paired up in the nucleus have higher-average momentum, leaving less for non-paired nucleons. Using ...

Cosmic jets of young stars formed by magnetic fields

Oct 16, 2014

Astrophysical jets are counted among our Universe's most spectacular phenomena: From the centers of black holes, quasars, or protostars, these rays of matter sometimes protrude several light years into space. ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

sheber
not rated yet Mar 10, 2008
Finally, the 21st century may see an end to the sadistic practice of shoving several large needles into babies thighs!!!
googleplex
not rated yet Mar 11, 2008
Ditto.
PVP appears to be safe so long as it's pure and not de-polymerized back to its monomer. The monomer is very bad. http://en.wikiped...povidone
weewilly
not rated yet Mar 11, 2008
This scares me when you think about what has happened in a mighty big way in Las Vegas recently. How will any patient ever know if it is safe and germ free??? Will it be an improvement or will this be a source of worry for us as short cuts are used by our long trusted Medical professionals. Some trust huh?