NASA, Grumman sign radar development pact

Feb 26, 2008

The U.S. space agency and the Northrop Grumman Corp. signed an agreement to develop systems to explore life and climate on Earth and other planets.

Researchers from Grumman's electronic systems division and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center are to collaborate in developing advanced civil radar system architectures that can be leveraged into new space-based remote sensing instruments.

The new systems are expected to revolutionize the study of other planets and to provide a leap forward in helping scientists understand climate change and the carbon cycle on Earth, officials said.

"The current state of the art for measuring carbon biomass in forests involves measuring tree-trunk diameters with tape measures," said Peter Hildebrand, Goddard's lead investigator for the project. "Since forests are huge, we obviously have a sampling problem.

"If, instead, we could use an advanced radar system to measure this from space, it would greatly improve our ability to measure the changes in forest carbon biomass as the climate changes," he said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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weewilly
not rated yet Feb 27, 2008
Having worked for Grumman on Long Island about a million years ago, I have a fond respect for the way they do things at that company. They are thorough and precise in their approach to new technology. So if the NASA people need great partners in finding new ways to do research, I would think they found some good ones there at Grumman.