Strategy for nanotechnology-related environmental, health and safety research

Feb 14, 2008

The Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council's Committee on Technology today released a document describing the National Nanotechnology Initiative’s (NNI) strategy for addressing priority research on the environment, health and safety (EHS) aspects of nanomaterials.

The full report, Strategy for Nanotechnology-Related Environmental, Health, and Safety Research is available at www.nano.gov/NNI_EHS_Research_Strategy.pdf .

In 2006, the Federal Government invested $64 million in 246 EHS projects at seven federal agencies. The strategy for prioritizing these projects entailed identifying and prioritizing EHS research for nanomaterials; analyzing the current research portfolio of the seven federal agencies funding EHS research; performing an analysis to determine areas requiring emphasis for further research; and developing a strategy address identified areas for research.

Strategy for Nanotechnology-Related Environmental, Health, and Safety Research, assigns priority to research and information needs that were identified in the NSET Subcommittee document Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials, published on September 21, 2006. An interim version of the strategy report, was Prioritization of Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials: An Interim Document for Public Comment, released in August 2007. Public comments, that played a role in shaping the final document, were accepted through September 17, 2007.

“This EHS research strategy is the result of a terrific team effort led by the NEHI Working Group. It reflects a strong consensus and commitment among the NNI member agencies on the roles they will assume, consistent with their respective missions and responsibilities, to move the Federal efforts in nanotechnology-related EHS research forward. The quality of the document demonstrates that the NNI is working hard to understand—and to think strategically about—nano EHS issues in a systematic, coordinated fashion,” said Dr. Clayton Teague, Director of the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office.

Source: National Nanotechnology Coordination Office

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