Unique infrared technique finds applications in nanoscience

Feb 12, 2008

The Springer journal Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry has chosen the Austrian chemist Thomas Lummerstorfer (31) as the recipient of its Best Paper Award 2007. Lummerstorfer’s paper “Monolayers at solid-solid interfaces probed with infrared spectroscopy” discusses an infrared technique which is expected to gain substantial importance in various fields of nanoscience. The winning paper will receive special prominence on an ABC cover. The Award is accompanied by EUR 1,000, sponsored by Springer.

Lummerstorfer’s paper is a review of his work establishing a new sandwich-like optical configuration for the measurement of infrared spectra of thin films and solid-solid interfaces. The study represents the first experimental demonstration of an enhancement effect that was theoretically predicted several decades ago but could never be verified experimentally.

This configuration allows not only the measurements of monolayer infrared spectra on a wide range of metal and nonmetal substrates with greatly improved sensitivity, but also allows reactions and processes taking place at the interface between two solid materials to be monitored spectroscopically.

The infrared technique he outlined is expected to be used in numerous fields of nanoscience and for routine surface infrared measurements. Thomas Lummerstorfer received his PhD from the Vienna University of Technology in 2005. He now works in research and development at Semperit GmbH in Austria.

Kiyokatsu Jinno, Editor of ABC said, "Dr. Lummerstorfer’s work indicates that infrared spectroscopy can be a powerful tool to investigate novel insights into the chemistry and structure of monolayers confined and compressed between two solid surfaces. His outstanding paper meets ABC’s high standards for excellent research publications."

The article is freely available online on SpringerLink at www.springerlink.com/content/?… %2fs00216-006-1010-4

Source: Springer

Explore further: Manipulation of light through tiny technology could lead to big benefits for everything from TVs to microscopes

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Embryos of stars

Feb 16, 2015

Stars like the Sun begin their lives as cold, dense cores of dust and gas that gradually collapse under the influence of gravity until nuclear fusion is ignited. Exactly how the critical collapse process ...

Infrared imaging technique operates at high temperatures

Jan 23, 2015

From aerial surveillance to cancer detection, mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) radiation has a wide range of applications. And as the uses for high-sensitivity, high-resolution imaging continue to expand, MWIR sources are becoming ...

Recommended for you

Flexible nanosensors for wearable devices

Feb 25, 2015

A new method developed at the Institute of Optoelectronics Systems and Microtechnology (ISOM) from the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) will enable the fabrication of optical nanosensors capable of sticking on uneven ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.