Online museum graduate course offered

Feb 05, 2008

Johns Hopkins University is offering a master of arts degree in museum studies in an online program opened to students around the world.

The program from the university's Krieger School of Arts and Sciences is designed to "provide a perspective on the theory and practice of museums in a changing technological, social and political environment for current and future museum professionals," said Professor Robert Kargon, chairman of the new program.

Associate program chairwoman Phyllis Hecht, formerly of the National Gallery of Art, said the project involves faculty members from academia and the museum community.

"Our students will learn from the experts in the field and will become the visionary leaders of tomorrow's museums," said Hecht, who noted the curriculum features the most up-to-date museum theory and practice.

The university said a short, but intensive, period of on-ground museum experience is required to complete the degree. The face-to-face summer classroom component takes place in Washington, where students will visit museums, meet high-level museum professionals, attend symposia and participate in a hands-on project.

Additional information is available at advanced.jhu.edu/academic/museum/

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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