Alienware's Giant Curved Monitor a Gamer's Delight

Jan 07, 2008 by Lisa Zyga weblog
Alienware Screen
The 42-inch curved seamless display is planned to go on sale in late 2008.

One of the more intriguing technologies at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) being held this week is a 42-inch-long, curved monitor. Made by Alienware, the monitor is supposed to simulate peripheral vision. The sci-fi-like screen is aimed at gamers for a more immersive experience, although it might not be as suitable for design or text work.

The Alienware monitor consists of a curved DLP (digital light processing) rear-projection display and is lit by OLEDs. Its resolution, at 2880x900, is considered fairly modest for a display of this size. But its 0.2 millisecond response time is definitely geared toward the quick reaction time desired by gamers. The company claims that this refresh rate is over a magnitude better than the competition.

If 42 inches is still not big enough for you, Alienware notes that the display only takes one DVI input for its signal input. That means it's possible to put two of these monitors side-by-side for a dual monitor configuration.

CES visitors have noticed one small flaw: three small vertical seams are slightly visible, revealing where separate screens meet. However, Alienware says the seams will be gone by the time the monitor hits the consumer market, sometime in the second half of 2008. The company doesn't yet have a name for the display, calling it simply a "curved seamless displlay." The price is yet to be determined.

via: Gizmodo

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LearmSceince
6 / 5 (1) Jan 07, 2008
"modest"? I'd say downright low. 2880 pixels over 42 inches is 68 pixels per inch, which is two-thirds of the standard assumption of 96, which is less than that used in "high" resolution setups.
NanoStuff
5 / 5 (1) Jan 13, 2008
It's like looking through a slit hole.