Pikes Peak Highway gets a face-lift

Dec 13, 2007

Construction is set to begin on a $6 million face-lift to restore terrain near Pikes Peak Highway in Colorado.

The Rocky Mountain Field Institute said the eight-year project will restore the area near Elk Park and another nearby creek to repair damage caused by water running off the gravel road, The (Colorado Springs) Gazette said Wednesday.

The runoff has carved out massive unnatural gullies, and the wetlands below have become choked with sediment, threatening aquatic life and the Colorado Springs water supply, the newspaper said.

The paving of the upper 12 miles of the highway is expected to be completed by 2012 at a cost of $1 million a mile.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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