Boeing launches second COSMO satellite

Dec 11, 2007

The Boeing Co. announced the successful U.S. launch of the second of four Italian COSMO satellites.

The satellite, part of the Constellation of Small Satellites for Mediterranean basin Observation, was launched by a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., at 6:31 p.m. Saturday.

"This successful Delta launch for the COSMO-SkyMed program once again illustrates the healthy partnership Boeing has with Italian industry and with the United Launch Alliance," said Roger Krone, president of network and space systems for Boeing Integrated Defense Systems.

Boeing Launch Services launched the first COSMO-SkyMed satellite in June and plans to support the launch of the third satellite next year.

Thales Alenia Space Italia developed the COSMO-SkyMed program for the Italian Space Agency and the Italian Ministry of Defense. It is an end-to-end Earth observation civil and military system comprised of four medium-sized satellites and supporting ground stations for orbit control systems and data reception and processing.

The system will take imagery of the Earth using an X-Band synthetic aperture radar instrument capable of operating in all visibility conditions, Boeing said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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