Storm names can boost insurance costs

Nov 30, 2007

Some meteorologists say the National Hurricane Center is giving out more storm names, which can mean higher costs for homeowners.

Former hurricane center director Neil Frank told The Houston Chronicle that as many as six of this year's 14 named tropical systems might have failed in the past to earn tropical storm status.

The newspaper said the number of a season's named storms is used to determine trends in hurricane activity, which are then used by insurance companies to set homeowners' rates.

Forecasters at the hurricane center say the practice of naming tropical storms has remained consistent over the past two decades.

Scientists, however, generally agree that before widespread satellite coverage, hurricane watchers annually missed one to three tropical storms that developed far from land or were too brief to register with older technology, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA sees intensifying typhoon Phanfone heading toward Japan

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tropical Storm Rachel dwarfed by developing system 90E

11 hours ago

Tropical Storm Rachel is spinning down west of Mexico's Baja California, and another tropical low pressure area developing off the coast of southwestern Mexico dwarfs the tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-West ...

NASA's HS3 looks Hurricane Edouard in the eye

7 hours ago

NASA and NOAA scientists participating in NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) mission used their expert skills, combined with a bit of serendipity on Sept. 17, 2014, to guide the remotely piloted ...

Satellite catches an oval-shaped Tropical Storm Rachel

Sep 25, 2014

NOAA's GOES-West satellite spotted the eighteenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific grow into a tropical storm that was renamed Rachel today, Sept. 25, 2014. Wind shear is affecting the tropical ...

Recommended for you

Sculpting tropical peaks

17 hours ago

Tropical mountain ranges erode quickly, as heavy year-round rains feed raging rivers and trigger huge, fast-moving landslides. Rapid erosion produces rugged terrain, with steep rivers running through deep ...

Volcano expert comments on Japan eruption

18 hours ago

Loÿc Vanderkluysen, PhD, who recently joined Drexel as an assistant professor in Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science in the College of Arts and Sciences, returned Friday from fieldwork ...

User comments : 0